Tolcarne Beach, Newquay, Cornwall


Newquay. Tolcarne Beach
Postmarked 1930
Publisher: Photochrom Co. Ltd

Google Street View (approximate).

Tolcarne is the largest of four beaches that join up at low tide to create the mile of golden sand that Newquay is famous for. Sandwiched between Great Western and Lusty Glaze, Tolcarne is sheltered on three sides by tall cliffs. At low tide it’s possible to walk across from Great Western beach. At high, access is via a steep flight of steps cut into the cliff.
The Beach Guide

Newquay is a town on the north coast in Cornwall, in the south west of England. It is a civil parish, seaside resort, regional centre for aerospace industries, future spaceport and a fishing port on the North Atlantic coast of Cornwall, approximately 12 miles (19 km) north of Truro and 20 miles (32 km) west of Bodmin. The town is bounded to the south by the River Gannel and its associated salt marsh, and to the north-east by the Porth Valley. The western edge of the town meets the Atlantic at Fistral Bay. The town has been expanding inland (south) since the former fishing village of New Quay began to grow in the second half of the nineteenth century.
. . .
After the arrival of passenger trains in 1876, the village around the port of Newquay started to grow quickly. Several major hotels were built around the end of the 19th century, the first being the Great Western Hotel which opened in 1879 in Station Road, now Cliff Road. Other early hotels included the Victoria in East Street, the Atlantic and the Headland, while many smaller hotels were created around this period by converting large houses, originally built by wealthy visitors as holiday homes, particularly along Narrowcliff. Three churches were built early in the twentieth century, including the present day parish church of St Michael the Archangel, which was consecrated in 1911. Growth of the town eastwards soon reached the area around the railway station: Station Road became Cliff Road around 1930, and the houses beyond, along Narrowcliff, were also converted into hotels. Narrowcliff was known for a while as Narrowcliff Promenade, and then Narrowcliff Road. On some pre-war maps, it is spelt Narrowcliffe. At the time of the First World War the last buildings at the edge of the town were a little further along present-day Narrowcliff, including the Hotel Edgcumbe. Post-war development saw new houses and streets built in the Chester Road area, accompanied by ribbon development along the country lane which led to St Columb Minor, some 2 miles (3 km) away. This thoroughfare was modernised and named Henver Road, also some time in the 1930s. Development continued in this direction until the Second World War, by which time much of Henver Road had houses on both sides, with considerable infilling also taking place between there and the sea.
Wikipedia.

 

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