Cleeve Lock, River Thames, Oxfordshire


Goring
c.1910

Google Street View.

Cleeve Lock is a lock on the River Thames, in Oxfordshire, England. It is located just upstream of Goring and Streatley villages, on the eastern side of the river within the village of Goring. There was formerly a separate Cleeve village, after which the lock is named, but it is now considered to be part of Goring. The first lock was built in 1787 by the Thames Navigation Commissioners. The reach above the lock is the longest, and the reach below it is the shortest, on the non-tidal river. . . . There was a flash lock recorded on the site in the 16th century. The first pound lock was built of oak in 1787 alongside a meadow which was then known as Winch Meadow. It was originally to be called Streatley Lock, but in the event took its name from the village of Cleeve on the opposite side of the river. Until 1869 Cleeve Lock and Goring Lock were usually operated a single keeper. The lock was rebuilt in 1874.
Wikipedia.

Way back in the 16th century a flash lock was documented here at Cleeve, the placename coming from a cliff, or clift – a cutting of a channel by water. This weir was converted into an oak pound lock in 1787 and rebuilt in stone in 1874 and converted to hydraulic operation in 1966/7. The lock had its own lock house by the tail gates but this was demolished and a new house was built in 1958 alongside the centre of the lock chamber.
The River Thames Guide

Five Rise Locks, Bingley, West Yorkshire


Five Rise Locks
Postmarked: 1907

Google Street View

YouTube: The Story of The Bingley Five Rise Locks – Viewed from Narrowboat and Drone

Bingley Five-rise lock staircase is the most spectacular feature of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. It is situated about half a mile north of Bingley Station, about 17 miles north west of Leeds and about 12 miles south east of Skipton. A lock staircase is where the locks open directly from one to another, with the top gate of one forming the bottom gate of the next. This unique 5-rise staircase has a total rise of 60 feet.
Pennine Waterways (also a lot of photos)

The five-rise opened on 21 March 1774 and was a major feat of engineering at the time. When the locks and therefore the canal from Gargrave to Thackley was opened in 1774, a crowd of 30,000 people turned out to celebrate. The first boat to use the locks took just 28 minutes.
Wikipedia


Bingley Five Rise Locks
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

Teddington Lock, England


Teddington Lock
Postmarked: 1905
Publisher: Stengel & Co

Google Street View.

The very first lock at Teddington was built in 1810 and was made of timber, this quickly became dilapidated and was replaced in 1856/7 with basically the launch lock that you see today (although it was refurbished in 1950) In 1904 the barge lock was added making Teddington Locks the largest lock system on the non-tidal Thames. Everything about Teddington Locks is big, we have the largest weir on the Thames , 20 electrically operated gates capable of letting 12 billion gallons (54.50 billion litres) of water through a day at peak flow. We also have the largest lock (The Barge Lock) which is 650 feet (198.12 metres) long and holds 1.75 million gallons (8 million litres) of water.
Teddington Lock

Teddington Lock is the lowest lock on the Thames and therefore the waters are tidal below the lock. There are, in fact, three separate locks chambers – a chamber was first built here in 1811 but replaced with a new one a little way downstream in 1857. This is the ‘launch’ lock we see today. In the same year, the tiny skiff lock was added especially for pleasure craft. This small beam-operated lock (nicknamed the coffin lock) is only 1.77metres (5ft 10in) wide, and 15.08metres (49ft 6in) long. In 1904 the mighty barge lock was built. Measuring 198.12metres (650ft) long and 7.54metres (24ft 9in) wide, this lock has an extra pair of gates (used infrequently) one third of the way along the chamber.
River Thames

Teddington Lock is a complex of three locks and a weir on the River Thames between Ham and Teddington in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, England. It was first built in 1810.
Wikipedia.

Bellanoch & Crinan Canal, Scotland


Bellanoch and Crinan Canal
1930s
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View (approximate).

Bellanoch, a village, with a public school, in North Knapdale parish, Argyllshire, near the W end of the Crinan Canal.
Ordnance gazetteer of Scotland : a survey of Scottish topography ; statistical, biographical, and historical, 1885

The canal goes from the middle of the W side of Loch Gilp, 9 miles west-north-westward, to Loch Crinan, in the vicinity of Crinan village, and enables vessels of 200 tons burden, from the upper Firth of Clyde to the Firth of Lorn, to avoid the difficult and circuitous passage of 70 miles round the Mull of Kintyre. Projected by Sir John Rennie in 1793, at an estimated cost of £63,678, it was opened in 1801 at an actual cost of £141,810 ; and even then other loans had to be obtained, which by 1814 had burdened the Company with a debt of £67,810. It is cut chiefly through chlorite schist, traversed by trap dykes, and showing indications of great geognostic disturbance ; and has eight locks between Loch Gilp and the summit-level (59 feet), and seven between that and Loch Crinan, thirteen of these locks being each 96 feet long and 24 wide, and the other two 108 feet long and 27 wide. The average depth of water is only 10 feet, the canal being fed by reservoirs on the hill above, whose bursting (2d Feb. 1859) washed away part of the banks and choked the channel for upwards of a mile with debris.
Ordnance gazetteer of Scotland : a survey of Scottish topography ; statistical, biographical, and historical, 1885