Watch Tower, Eston Nab, North Yorkshire


Watch Tower, Eston Nab.
Postmarked 1906
Publisher: Brittain & Wright, Stockton-on-Tees

Google Street View (approximate).

In the south-eastern section of the hillfort, where a modern monument marks its position there are the remains of a square, stone beacon. This is situated within a small quadrangular enclosure and is believed to have been erected in the early 19th century when it served as a beacon or lookout post during the Napoleonic wars.
Historic England

With the advent of ironstone mining in Eston Hills, the beacon was used as a house and survived until 1956. It was then demolished and later rebuilt into its present form. A plaque on the side of the monument reads:

This monument is placed here to mark the
site of the beacon tower which was erected
by Thomas Jackson of Lackenby about 1800 as
a look-out post against invasion during the
Napoleonic wars and which again served the same
purpose in the second world war of 1939–1945.
It stands within a Bronze Age fortified
camp whose outer defences can be seen.
Erected in 1956.
Wikipedia.

Eaglescliffe, County Durham


Eaglescliffe VIllage
(underneath says “Jervaulx Abbey, Wensley Dale”)
c.1910
Publishers: Brittain & Wright, Stockton-on-Tees

Google Street View.

First recorded in the 11th Century, Egglescliffe was a small village on the Co. Durham side of the tidal River Tees, with a Parish Church dating back in parts to the 12th Century. The Ancient Parish consisted of three townships, of which one became the Civil Parish of Egglescliffe in 1894, when our Parish Council was formed. In 1825 the Stockton & Darlington Railway was opened through the Parish. Two years later the victim of the World’s first recorded fatality on a public railway was buried in the Churchyard here. A further railway line 25 years later entered the Parish by the 48-arch Yarm Viaduct to a new station called “Eaglescliffe”. A new settlement, Eaglescliffe Junction, partly in the Parish, grew up round the Station.
Egglescliffe & Eaglescliffe Parish Council

Knaresborough, North Yorkshire


Knaresborough from Castle Hill
Postmarked 1903

Google Street View.

With its cobbled alleys, a once royal castle, annual bed race and the enduring curiosity of Mother Shipton’s Cave and its petrifying well, it is fair to say that Knaresborough is both charming and unique. Packed with history and character, the North Yorkshire market town is a hotbed for tourists – and no trip is complete without taking in its impressive viaduct.
Yorkshire Post

Knaresborough Viaduct is a viaduct in the North Yorkshire town of Knaresborough, England. The viaduct carries the Harrogate line over the River Nidd in the town. The viaduct was supposed to have opened in 1848, but the first construction collapsed into the river very near to completion, which necessitated a new viaduct and delayed the opening of the line through Knaresborough by three years.
Wikipedia.

Viaduct. 1851. Engineer Thomas Grainger for the Leeds and Thirsk Railway Gritstone. Approximately 100 metres long and 30 metres high, carrying 2 tracks on 4 arches. 2 central round arches span the river, the 2 flanking arches span the Long Walk (south bank) and Waterside (north bank). Round cut-waters carried up as buttresses with projecting bands and small half-towers at top. Embattled parapet. Work on the viaduct was begun in 1847, but the bridge collapsed in 1848. The replacement cost £9,803 to construct.
Historic England

Donnington Castle, Donnington, Berkshire


Donnington Castle, Newbury
Publiser: Valentine

Google Street View.

Donnington Castle has been partially demolished and only the late fourteenth Gatehouse survives. The site is surrounded by substantial seventeenth century earthworks which are some of the best preserved examples of their kind in the UK.
Castles Forts Battles

The castle consisted originally of a curtain wall with four round corner towers, two square wall towers and a substantial gatehouse, constructed around a courtyard in the style typical of the fortified residences of the period. Accommodation was provided in the towers or in buildings within the courtyard, set against the castle walls. The courtyard buildings are likely to have been of timber construction and possibly included a hall, a kitchen and lodgings for guests.
. . .
During the Civil War Charles I set up his headquarters in Oxford and in 1643 dispatched Sir John Boys, with 200 foot soldiers, 25 cavalry and sufficient cannon to resist a siege, to take possession of Donnington from the Parliamentarian John Packer. Having taken the castle, Boys built defences around the lower slopes of the hill in the shape of a star, the projections providing sites for gun emplacements that gave a good field of fire. Between 1644 and 1646 the castle was attacked many times, twice being relieved by the king in person. Only when the Royalist cause appeared hopeless did Boys surrender to the Parliamentarian troops, after first obtaining the king’s permission to do so. Parliament voted to demolish the badly damaged castle in 1646 and only the gatehouse was left standing

Bayle Gate, Bridlington, East Yorkshire


Bayle Gate, Bridlington
c.1910
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View.

The word Bayle (pronounced Bay-ul) is derived from the French word Baille meaning ‘enclosure’ or ‘ward’. Archaeological surveys have concluded the original stonework dates to the 12th Century when it is originally thought to have been a gatehouse to a wooden palisade castle built by William Le Gros in 1143, although little information remains as to the further use of the building until the early 14th Century.

In the 14th Century the Bayle Gate was adapted to become the Gatehouse to the Bridlington Priory; the ground floor of the then 2 storey building housed a Porter and an Almoner. The role of the Porter was to monitor the comings and goings of the people, take tolls for the entrance to the Priory markets and receive visitors. The Almoner distributed food and ale to the poor of Bridlington. The first floor rooms were likely used as guest rooms as in other monasteries of the region.

Since the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII the Bayle Gate has been used for a number of purposes, sometimes simultaneously. Prior uses include a Prison, a Court of the town, a Schoolroom for merchant’s apprentices, a Garrison for Napoleonic soldiers on route to Scarborough Castle, a Town Hall and a meeting room for the Lords Feoffees.
The Bayle Museum

Gelert’s Grave, Beddelgert, Wales


Beddelgert, Gelert’s Grave

Google Street View.

A short walk south of the village, following the footpath along the banks of the Glaslyn leads to Beddgelert’s most famous historical feature; ‘Gelert’s Grave’. According to legend, the stone monument in the field marks the resting place of ‘Gelert’, the faithful hound of the medieval Welsh Prince Llewelyn the Great. The story, as written on the tombstone reads:

“In the 13th century Llewelyn, prince of North Wales, had a palace at Beddgelert. One day he went hunting without Gelert, ‘The Faithful Hound’, who was unaccountably absent. On Llewelyn’s return the truant, stained and smeared with blood, joyfully sprang to meet his master. The prince alarmed hastened to find his son, and saw the infant’s cot empty, the bedclothes and floor covered with blood. The frantic father plunged his sword into the hound’s side, thinking it had killed his heir. The dog’s dying yell was answered by a child’s cry. Llewelyn searched and discovered his boy unharmed, but nearby lay the body of a mighty wolf which Gelert had slain. The prince filled with remorse is said never to have smiled again. He buried Gelert here”.
Beddelgert Tourism

To this day, a cairn of stones marks the place, and the name Beddgelert means in Welsh ‘The grave of Gelert’. Every year thousands of people visit the grave of this brave dog; slight problem however, is that the cairn of stones is actually less than 200 years old!

Nevertheless this story has great appeal. History and myth appear to have become a little confused when in 1793, a man called David Pritchard came to live in Beddgelert. He was the landlord of the Royal Goat Inn and knew the story of the brave dog and adapted it to fit the village, and so benefit his trade at the inn. He apparently invented the name Gelert, and introduced the name Llywelyn into the story because of the Prince’s connection with the nearby Abbey, and it was with the help of the parish clerk that Pritchard, not Llywelyn, raised the cairn!
Historic UK

St John’s Gate, Canterbury, England


Canterbury. St John’s Gate
c.1910
Publisher: E. Crow & Son, Canterbury

Google Street View (from other side)

The hospital of St. John is situated on the west side of Northgate Street, and is entered by a fine wooden arch, under an interesting house.
“The archaeological album; or, Museum of national antiquities”, Wright, Thomas, 1845

St John’s Hospital
Northgate

This is possibly the oldest group of almshouses in England as it was founded by the first Norman Archbishop of Canterbury, Lanfranc, in about 1085. It was originally built for around 80 inmates, drawn from the lame, the weak and the infirm, who would have been cared for by the priests from the nearby priory of St Gregory the Great, no longer existing. The splendid gatehouse fronting Northgate dates from Tudor times and inside, the charming green is surrounded by four 19th century houses accommodating 24 residents

Canterbury History and Archaeological Society

Bellanoch & Crinan Canal, Scotland


Bellanoch and Crinan Canal
1930s
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View (approximate).

Bellanoch, a village, with a public school, in North Knapdale parish, Argyllshire, near the W end of the Crinan Canal.
Ordnance gazetteer of Scotland : a survey of Scottish topography ; statistical, biographical, and historical, 1885

The canal goes from the middle of the W side of Loch Gilp, 9 miles west-north-westward, to Loch Crinan, in the vicinity of Crinan village, and enables vessels of 200 tons burden, from the upper Firth of Clyde to the Firth of Lorn, to avoid the difficult and circuitous passage of 70 miles round the Mull of Kintyre. Projected by Sir John Rennie in 1793, at an estimated cost of £63,678, it was opened in 1801 at an actual cost of £141,810 ; and even then other loans had to be obtained, which by 1814 had burdened the Company with a debt of £67,810. It is cut chiefly through chlorite schist, traversed by trap dykes, and showing indications of great geognostic disturbance ; and has eight locks between Loch Gilp and the summit-level (59 feet), and seven between that and Loch Crinan, thirteen of these locks being each 96 feet long and 24 wide, and the other two 108 feet long and 27 wide. The average depth of water is only 10 feet, the canal being fed by reservoirs on the hill above, whose bursting (2d Feb. 1859) washed away part of the banks and choked the channel for upwards of a mile with debris.
Ordnance gazetteer of Scotland : a survey of Scottish topography ; statistical, biographical, and historical, 1885

Westgate, Canterbury, England


Canterbury, West Gate
c.1910
Publisher: E. Crow, Canterbury

Google Street View.

The Westgate is a medieval gatehouse in Canterbury, Kent, England. This 60-foot (18 m) high western gate of the city wall is the largest surviving city gate in England. Built of Kentish ragstone around 1379, it is the last survivor of Canterbury’s seven medieval gates, still well-preserved and one of the city’s most distinctive landmarks.
Wikipedia.

The largest and arguably the finest of the country’s surviving medieval gateways was built during the 100 Years’ War to defend Canterbury from foreign incursion, and to demonstrate the city’s wealth and importance. The 60-foot (18m) stronghold did not stand alone, as it does now, but was approached over a drawbridge and flanked by impressive walls. Time passed, the military threat lessened, and Westgate was converted into the city gaol. This function, too, came to an end; after a brief period as an archive, it became a museum at the start of the 20th century. Brought back into active service in both World Wars, it played a crucial role in the city’s air defences.
One Pound Lane