St. Mawes, Cornwall


St Mawes
c.1940

Google Street View.

St Mawes is very picturesque, situated on a little bay between the main estuary of the River Fal and its tributary Percuil River. It owes its origin and name to a Celtic preacher who arrived around AD 550 to live as a hermit in what was then a very remote place. It had grown to a small town by the 13th century and in 1562 was granted borough status by Elizabeth I. It received the right to elect two MPs and was a notorious “rotten borough”. Its historic pilchard fishing trade has now been replaced by its role as a top-end resort.
South West Coast Path

St Mawes is a small village opposite Falmouth, on the Roseland Peninsula on the south coast of Cornwall, United Kingdom. It lies on the east bank of the Carrick Roads, a large waterway created after the Ice Age from an ancient valley which flooded as the melt waters caused the sea level to rise dramatically. The immense natural harbour created is often claimed to be the third largest in the world. It was once a busy fishing port, but the trade declined during the 20th century and it now serves as a popular tourist location, with many properties in the village functioning as holiday accommodation
Wikipedia.


St Mawes
c.1910 (postmarked 1949)

Teignmouth, England


A Rough Sea | Teignmouth
c.1910
Pubishers: J. Welch & Sons, Portsmouth

Google Street View.

Teignmouth is a large seaside town, fishing port and civil parish in the English county of Devon, situated on the north bank of the estuary mouth of the River Teign about 12 miles south of Exeter. It had a population of 14,749 in 2019 at the last census. From the 1800s onwards, the town rapidly grew in size from a fishing port associated with the Newfoundland cod industry to a fashionable resort of some note in Georgian times, with further expansion after the opening of the South Devon Railway in 1846. Today, its port still operates and the town remains a popular seaside and day trip holiday location.
. . .
By 1803 Teignmouth was called a “fashionable watering place”, and the resort continued to develop during the 19th century. Its two churches were rebuilt soon after 1815 and in the 1820s the first bridge across the estuary to Shaldon was built; George Templer’s New Quay opened at the port; and the esplanade, Den Crescent and the central Assembly Rooms (later the cinema) were laid out. The railway arrived in 1846 and the pier was built 1865–7. . . . The First World War had a disruptive effect on Teignmouth: over 175 men from the town lost their lives and many businesses did not survive. In the 1920s as the economy started to recover, a golf course opened on Little Haldon; the Morgan Giles shipbuilding business was established, and charabancs took employees and their families for annual outings to Dartmoor and elsewhere. By the 1930s the town was again thriving, and with the Haldon Aerodrome and School of Flying nearby, Teignmouth was advertised as the only south coast resort offering complete aviation facilities. During the Second World War Teignmouth suffered badly from “tip and run” air raids. It was bombed 21 times between July 1940 and February 1944 and 79 people were killed, 151 wounded, 228 houses were destroyed and over 2,000 damaged in the raids.
Wikipedia.


The Harbour, Teignmouth
1940s
D. Constance Ltd, London

Google Street View (approximate).

Oban, Scotland


On the back:
Oban is picturesquely situated on the eastern shore of Oban Bay and, being protected from the full force of the sea by the sheltering Island of Kerrera, is a safe and comfortable harbour. Boats for the western parts of Scotland call here regularly, and it one of the best centres for the exploration of the Western Highlands.
Postmarked 1920
Publisher: Raphael Tuck & Sons

Google Street View.

Oban is a resort town within the Argyll and Bute council area of Scotland. Despite its small size, it is the largest town between Helensburgh and Fort William. During the tourist season, the town can have a temporary population of up to over 24,000 people. Oban occupies a setting in the Firth of Lorn. The bay forms a near perfect horseshoe, protected by the island of Kerrera; and beyond Kerrera, the Isle of Mull. To the north, is the long low island of Lismore and the mountains of Morvern and Ardgour.
. . .
The modern town of Oban grew up around the distillery, which was founded there in 1794. A royal charter raised the town to a burgh of barony in 1811. Sir Walter Scott visited the area in 1814, the year in which he published his poem The Lord of the Isles; interest in the poem brought many new visitors to the town. The town was made a Parliamentary Burgh in 1833. A rail link – the Callander and Oban Railway – was authorised in 1864 but took years to reach the town. The final stretch of track to Oban opened on 30 June 1880. This brought further prosperity, revitalising local industry and giving new energy to tourism. Also at this time work on the ill-fated Oban Hydro commenced; the enterprise was abandoned and left to fall into disrepair after 1882 when Dr Orr, the scheme’s originator, realised he had grossly underestimated its cost. Work on McCaig’s Tower, a prominent local landmark, started in 1895. Paid for by John Stewart McCaig (1824-1902) the construction aimed, in hard times, to give work for local stonemasons. However, its construction ceased in 1902 on the death of its benefactor.
Wikipedia.

View from Worlebury Camp, Weston-Super-Mare, England


View from the Roman Encampment, Weston Super Mare
Publisher: G.D. Coulsting, Weston-Super-Mare

The white stuff across the bottom of the image is the stones of the hillfort’s ramparts.

Google Street View.

Worlebury Hill Fort Group

The Megalithic Portal

Worlebury Camp (also known as Worlebury Hillfort) is the site of an Iron Age hillfort on Worlebury Hill, north of Weston-super-Mare in Somerset, England. The fort was designed for defence, as is evidenced by the number of walls and ditches around the site. Several large triangular platforms have been uncovered around the sides of the fort, lower down on the hillside. Nearly one hundred storage pits of various sizes were cut into the bedrock, and many of these had human remains, coins, and other artefacts in them.
Wikipedia.

The large multivallate hillfort on Worlebury Hill is an outstanding example of its class. It survives well and is known from excavations to contain archaeological and environmental information relating to the monument and the landscape in which it was constructed and later reused. This example is unusual in terms of its location as hillforts on this scale are rarely situated on coastal promontories.
Historic England.

Torquay, Devon


Hesketh Crescent, Torquay
c.1910
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View (approximate)

The second phase in the expansion of Torquay began when Torre railway station was opened on 18 December 1848. The improved transport connections resulted in rapid growth at the expense of nearby towns not on Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s railways. The more central Torquay railway station was opened on 2 August 1859 with views of the sea from the platforms. After the growth of the preceding decades, Torquay was granted borough status in 1892. Torquay Tramways operated electric street trams from 1907. They were initially powered by the unusual Dolter stud-contact electrification so as not to disfigure the town with overhead wires, but in 1911, was converted to more conventional overhead-line supply. The line was extended into Paignton in 1911 but the network was closed in 1934.

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution’s Torquay Lifeboat Station was at the Ladies Bathing Cove from 1876 until 1923. A second lifeboat was kept at the harbour from 1917 until 1928. Torquay was regarded as a “Spa Town” after the Marine Spa was built on Beacon Hill near the harbour. Originally called the “Bath Saloons complex”, it had an open air tide-filled swimming bath. The complex was opened in 1853 after Beacon Hill headland was dynamited to make space for it. Charles Dickens was said to have made readings there.
Wikipedia.

You can’t get much more of a ‘traditional British seaside’ resort than the vibrant and cheerful town of Torquay. Set at the very heart of the English Riviera on the South Devon Coast, Torquay is famous for its sandy beaches, family attractions and genteel Victorian appearance. Made famous by the legendary comedy series Fawlty Towers, Torbay is distinctly Mediterranean and is a family favourite with plenty of attractions and things to do.

Torquay was a relatively minor settlement until the mid 19th Century when the railway linked it to the rest of the UK. The improved transport connections saw Torquay expand rapidly to cater for the area’s popularity with the Victorian’s desire to explore everything and everywhere, including the furthest flung corners of Britain. After the First World War the Great Western Railway Company extensively promoted Torquay, helping the town to become a major UK holiday resort.
Visit South Devon

Hesketh Crescent was commissioned by Sir Lawrence Palk, the Fourth Baronet who was elevated to a peerage in 1880 and became ‘Lord Haldon, of Haldon, Devon’ and after whom Haldon Pier and Haldon Road were named. The crescent was designed by the brothers William and John Harvey and was completed in 1848, taking two years to construct. It has been reported as being ‘The finest crescent of houses in the west of England’ and John Wilson wrote “The Regency ideals of London and Brighton reached their highest in the building of Hesketh Crescent.” The crescent originally called ‘Meadfoot Crescent’ was renamed ‘Hesketh Crescent’ in 1849 after the first fruit of Sir Lawrence’s marriage to Maria Hesketh in 1845; their first son was called Sir Lawrence Hesketh Palk. The Palk family had been notable landowners in and around Torquay for generations and produced the first town plan for Torquay.
The Osborne Apartments


Torre Abbey Sands and Promenade, Torquay
c.1920

Google Street View.

Torre Abbey Sands is an excellent long sandy beach west of Torquay harbour and is located along the seafront in Torquay. This is the main beach for Torquay and is popular with holidaymakers from the surrounding hotels, day visitors and locals. The sandy beach is great for making sandcastles and rests between rock headlands which provide a safe sheltered area.
Torbay.gov.uk