Tresco Abbey Gardens, Isles of Scilly


Scilly Isles. Old Abbey Ruins. Dracaena in Bloom.
c.1910
Publisher: Pictorial Stationery Co.

Google Street View.

In 1834, Augustus Smith left Hertfordshire and took up residence on the Isles of Scilly as Lord Proprietor and leaseholder of all the islands, choosing Tresco as his home… He selected a site adjacent to St Nicholas Priory – which had fallen into disrepair in the sixteenth century – to build his home. On a rocky outcrop above these ruins, Augustus Smith built his house, which he named Tresco Abbey. In addition to constructing the house, he started almost immediately creating a garden based around the priory ruins. In order to protect his early plantings from the winter gales, he built a series of walls around the garden. The garden then expanded across the south-facing hillside on a series of terraces carved from the granite subsoil.
Tresco Island

Tresco Priory is a former monastic settlement on Tresco, Isles of Scilly founded in 946 AD. It was re-founded as the Priory of St Nicholas by monks from Tavistock Abbey in 1114. A charter of King Henry I mentions a priory as belonging to Tavistock Abbey in the reign of Edward the Confessor. . . The Priory did not survive the Dissolution of the Monasteries and may well have closed earlier. The remains of the priory are now incorporated into Tresco Abbey Gardens.
Wikipedia.


Scilly. | Tresco Abbey.
c.1910

Google Street View.

Tresco Abbey Gardens are located on the island of Tresco in the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom. The 17 acre gardens were established by the nineteenth-century proprietor of the islands, Augustus Smith, originally as a private garden within the grounds of the home he designed and built. The gardens are designated at Grade I in the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.

Augustus Smith chose Tresco as the site of his home because the site was more or less central in relation to the rest of the islands. It is also close to the original abbey ruins, is near a fresh water pool and overlooks the sand dunes and beach at Carn Near. The area at the time was barren land and the original building, designed by Smith and started in 1835, was small in comparison to the current building. He made additions to the house in 1843 and 1861. The Grade II listed house consists of roughly coursed granite with ashlar dressings and a slate roof. Some of the timbers from the 1861 wreck of the Award were used for the panelling and roof of the new dining room, as well as panelling of the rooms Annet, Rosevean and Rosevear. His successor, Thomas Smith-Dorrien-Smith, added the tower in 1891.
Wikipedia.

Country house. Mostly of 1843 and 1861, with tower of 1891, for Augustus Smith and Thomas Algernon Dorrien Smith. Roughly coursed granite with ashlar dressings; slate roofs and granite ashlar stacks. Complex evolved plan: main square block with east tower, to east of west wing and south-west wing. 2 and 3 storeys. North elevation has 3-storey entrance bay between main block and west wing, with monogram AS and date 1843 over chamfered 4-centred arched doorway; this is flanked by a slender 3-storey tower with small windows
Historic England


Mesembryanthemums
Aloes Steps, Tresco
Scilly

c.1910
Publisher: “The ‘Neptune’ Series by C. King, Scilly Isles”

Google Street View.

Ladies Bathing Place, Portrush, Co. Antrim


Ladies Bathing Place, Portrush
1930s, postmarked 1943
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View.

The Victorians discovered and extolled the health advantages of sea air and sea-water bathing during the later years of the 19thCentury. Even much later, in 1929, the Portrush Urban District Council was extolling the virtues of the summer Atlantic breezes – “provide a pure and bracing atmosphere which is wonderfully invigorating and far-famed as the best of tonics”. A small sheltered beach on the East side of the Portrush Peninsula became popular with ladies and children and in time became known as “The Ladies Bathing Place”. Victorian sensibilities precluded mixed bathing so gentlemen had to find other locations such as the Blue Pool for their own bathing.
. . .
By the turn of the century the popularity of the Ladies Bathing Place necessitated the provision of better facilities which were provided in due course by Messrs Robert Chalmers, a local businessman, Town Councillor and Mr Campbell joint proprietors of “Campbell & Chalmers, The Corner Shop” Grocers and Provision Merchants on Main Street, Portrush. Their new shop replaced the early wooden kiosks and provided confectionery, refreshments, souvenirs and other beach side requisites. The sign on the shop invited us to purchase genuine Cailler’s Swiss Chocolate which, they claimed, was the best-selling chocolate in the world.

By 1912 the upsurge in business required larger premises and again Messrs Chalmers & Campbell were there to provide for the needs of holidaymakers. A new two storey shop with single storey side extension was provided in which there was a fine café. In good weather customers could partake of their repast on the roof balcony. This was also used for evening tea dances which might feature entertainment such as Madame Levantes’ Ladies Orchestra. A concrete breakwater and sun-deck were also constructed at this time. By 1926 the name “Arcadia” had appeared on the café and shop and the café had acquired a roofed upper storey with the lower storey being remodelled to match. This upper storey contained a small ballroom with a stage at the seaward end and was used for tea dances and other functions for many years. Several kiosks were still provided beside the Arcadia probably providing deckchairs and other beach goods and bathing boxes were still available to the rear with direct access to the beach and the sea.
Discover Portrush

Pagoda, Kew Gardens, London


Pagoda, Kew Gardens
Postmarked 1906
Publisher: Millar & Lang, Glasgow

Google Street View.

Kew’s Pagoda was completed in 1762 as a gift for Princess Augusta, the founder of the Gardens. It was one of several Chinese buildings designed for Kew by Sir William Chambers, who had spent time travelling and studying the architecture of East Asia. A popular ‘folly’ of the age, it offered one of the earliest and finest bird’s eye views of London
Royal Botatanic Gardens, Kew

The Great Pagoda was completed in only six months. The speed of completion and the quality of construction were points of pride for Chambers; “the walls of the building are composed of very hard bricks…neatly laid, and with such care, that there is not the least crack or fracture in the whole structure, notwithstanding its great height, and the expedition with which it was built”. 80 gilded dragons decorated the roofs of its ten storeys although these had been removed by 1784. The height of the building impressed contemporaries; in 1762, Horace Walpole wrote to a friend, “the Pagoda at Kew begins to rise above the trees and soon you will see it from Yorkshire”.
Wikipedia.

At the time of its construction it was considered so unusual that people were unconvinced it would remain standing. Chambers studied oriental architecture in China, but when he designed Kew’s pagoda he ignored the rules. Pagodas should have an odd number of floors, traditionally seven (rather than ten), believed to represent seven steps to heaven. The Great Pagoda was the most accurate reconstruction of a Chinese building in Europe at the time. It was originally flanked by a Moorish Alhambra and a Turkish Mosque, follies that were all the rage in the great gardens of the time.
Wordl Heritage Journeys

The dragons are back at Kew after more than two centuries, tails curled, wings neatly furled to make them less of a wind catcher, gazing down with glittering eyes on the acres of gardens and thousands of visitors far below. . . . Legends insisted they were made of gem-studded enamelled bronze or even solid gold, and that they were stripped off the pagoda to settle the Prince of Wales’s gambling debts, or to decorate his extraordinary oriental-styled in Brighton. The truth was more boring. Chambers took them off when he restored the building in 1784, because although they looked magnificent, they were made of cheap pine and after a spell of atrocious weather – the Thames froze over in 1783 – they were rotten.

Their replacements, blazing in green, blue, red and gold, guard a secret. The eight at ground level were hand carved from cedar wood, but the 72 dragons on the higher floors were produced on a 3D printer. “The biggest engineering problem we had was attaching the dragons to the roofs,” Putnam said. “They didn’t worry much about health and safety in the 18th century, but the biggest of the printed ones weigh less than 10 kilos, and the wooden ones weigh a quarter tonne – to make them all in wood we’d have had to punch the original structure through and through with steel-reinforcing rods to hold them.”
The Guardian

Racecource, Doncaster, South Yorkshire


St. Leger Week, Doncaster
c. 1910
Publisher: Shurey’s Publications (1903-1927)

This seems to be people arriving at the racecourse. (Horse Shoe Pond on the right.)

Google Maps (racecourse location)

The St Leger Stakes is a Group 1 flat horse race in Great Britain open to three-year-old thoroughbred colts and fillies. It is run at Doncaster over a distance of 1 mile, 6 furlongs and 115 yards (2,921 metres), and it is scheduled to take place each year in September. Established in 1776, the St Leger is the oldest of Britain’s five Classics. It is the last of the five to be run each year, and its distance is longer than any of the other four. Doncaster is one of the oldest established centres for horse racing in Britain, with records of regular race meetings going back to the 16th century. In 1600 the corporation tried to put an end to the races because of the number of ruffians they attracted, but by 1614 it acknowledged failure and instead marked out a racecourse.
Doncaster Racecourse

The Town Moor at Doncaster served as a race course since the late sixteenth century. By the mid-eighteenth centuy racing was firmly established on the site, supported by the Doncaster Corporation, which offered plates and money as prizes to encourage it. The Doncaster Gold Cup is the oldest still-recognizable race held there, first run in 1766; the St. Leger, which began as a sweepstakes on a course nearby, was moved to the site in 1778. The course is about a mile and seven and one-half furlongs in circumference, and is mostly level, with the exception of a low hill a mile and one-half from the winning post.
Thoroughbred Heritage

Royal Box, Grandstand, Goodwood, West Sussex


Goodwood, Grand Stand, Royal Box
1906
Publisher: Francis Frith

Google Street View (approximate).

A new stand was built in 1903 with a Royal pavilion attached at the paddock end for the King. At the other end, Queen Alexandra had a box with a private underground passage connecting the two. No expense was spared for either box: the King’s lavatory was made of monogrammed marble.
Goodwood

In 1976, however, the parade ring was moved to the south side of the racecourse behind the March Stand. At the same time, the weighing room, which had previously been in the old Charlton building, was relocated to the north side of the parade ring. This involved moving the old road south of the racecourse. The old Stand was demolished after the Festival meeting of 1979 and replaced by the present March Stand, designed by the architect Sir Philip Dowson, which won the annual Concrete Society Award.
Goodwood via Wayback Machine

The Old Fox With Its Teeth Drawn, Bricket Wood, Hertfordshire


The Old Fox
c.1910
“The Popular Series”

Google Maps.

Originally a pub known as The Fox and then The Old Fox, after its license was withdrawn around 1900 it became a temperance house and tea cottage trading under the name of “The Old Fox With His Teeth Drawn”. It is now a private house. A public house also known as the “Old Fox” lies about 200 metres to the south west.
Historic England

The following comes from the Town and Country Talk column published in the Watford Observer on March 18, 1949.
. . .
Headed “Painless Extraction”, [the article] reads: “Nearby is another relic of bygone days. An old thatched cottage, standing on the side of a pond, bears the inscription ‘The Old Fox With His Teeth Drawn’. Once it bore the title of ‘The Old Fox’ and Mr Isaac Dalby, a 68-year-old smallholder, who lives next door, can well remember the happy days when a threepenny bit passed over the counter produced a pint of beer and ten cigarettes. Rumour has it, however, that some of the customers were not able to avoid the pond when coming out after an evening in the snug atmosphere of the inn, with its timbered roof and strong ale. In any case, the late Lord Knutsford (Mr Arthur Holland-Hibbert as he then was) acquired the property and ‘drew its teeth’ by turning it into a temperance cafe.”

There’s a little more on the place in A Souvenir of Bricket Wood”, an excellent booklet published by the Bricket Wood Society in 1982. In a section on public houses, the booklet states “at the end of the 16th Century there were over 500 officially licensed premises in hertfordshire. There were three types of public house – the inn (providing food, drink and lodging), the tavern (selling wine, sometimes food and lodging) and the alehouse, later beerhouse (selling ale or beer but no food or lodging).” It continues: “In the latter half of the 19th Century, there were seven licensed premises in the Bricket Wood area – The Chequers, The Green Man, The Blackboy, The Fox, The Young Fox, The Fox and Hounds and The Gate, four of which exist today.” Not even four any more, I’m afraid (but I suppose you could technically add Moor Mill to the list nowadays). Anyway, the “Souvenir” continues: “About the turn of the century, The Old Fox had its licence revoked and became known as The Old Fox With His Teeth Drawn; it served teas until about 50 years ago 9i.e. the early 1930s).
Watford Observer

In the late 19th Century there were two public houses within the bounds of the Conservation Area – ‘The Fox’ and ‘The Old Fox with His Teeth Drawn’. The former
remains a public house. Names have changed over the years and the progression of ‘fox’ names is slightly confusing…’The Old Fox with His Teeth Drawn’ began life as ‘The Fox’, then became ‘The Old Fox’ until its license was withdrawn in 1893. The current Old Fox P.H. began life as The Fox, but known as The ‘Young’ Fox and the two pubs competed for trade until A. Holland-Hibbert (later Viscount Knutsford), bought The Old Fox in 1893. He was a teetotaler and revoked its license in circa 1917 due to the abuse of drinking by the newly attracted in-comers. It then served teas (and sweets and flowers) as a Temperance House under the new name ‘The Old Fox With His Teeth Drawn’. Previously a single storey small scale weatherboarded building, it is now a private house, white rendered with rooms in the roof, and the only thatched property in Bricket Wood. Wrapping around the front of the house is an old pond, discernable in part on the Tithe Map, which is still inhabited by waterfowl.
Conservation Area Character Statement, St Albans City & District Council (PDF)

Cleeve Lock, River Thames, Oxfordshire


Goring
c.1910

Google Street View.

Cleeve Lock is a lock on the River Thames, in Oxfordshire, England. It is located just upstream of Goring and Streatley villages, on the eastern side of the river within the village of Goring. There was formerly a separate Cleeve village, after which the lock is named, but it is now considered to be part of Goring. The first lock was built in 1787 by the Thames Navigation Commissioners. The reach above the lock is the longest, and the reach below it is the shortest, on the non-tidal river. . . . There was a flash lock recorded on the site in the 16th century. The first pound lock was built of oak in 1787 alongside a meadow which was then known as Winch Meadow. It was originally to be called Streatley Lock, but in the event took its name from the village of Cleeve on the opposite side of the river. Until 1869 Cleeve Lock and Goring Lock were usually operated a single keeper. The lock was rebuilt in 1874.
Wikipedia.

Way back in the 16th century a flash lock was documented here at Cleeve, the placename coming from a cliff, or clift – a cutting of a channel by water. This weir was converted into an oak pound lock in 1787 and rebuilt in stone in 1874 and converted to hydraulic operation in 1966/7. The lock had its own lock house by the tail gates but this was demolished and a new house was built in 1958 alongside the centre of the lock chamber.
The River Thames Guide

The Gardens, Bournemouth, England


The Gardens, Bournemouth
c.1910
Publishers: Sydenham & Co, Bournemouth

Google Street View.

The Lower Gardens in Bournemouth are only a five minute walk from the main shopping centre, the beach and the pier. They are Grade II Listed Gardens and have the TripAdvisor Travellers’ Choice Award for 2020. Visitors who walk through the gardens will be amazed by the beautiful floral displays that combine a range of colours, textures and scents. The Gardens also have plenty of activities to keep visitors busy including music at the Pine Walk bandstand, an aviary, mini golf course and an art exhibition during the summer. It’s a beautiful setting to just sit and watch the world go by with a coffee or have a delicious picnic with friends and family as well as a welcome haven from the hustle and bustle of the town. During the winter there is the fantastic Christmas Tree Wonderland which features a beautiful trail of Christmas trees and seasonal activities and attracts thousands of visitors every year. There is also a large rock garden which was which was built in the 1930s.
Bournemouth

Until the beginning of the 19th century the area was mainly vegetation and marsh. Development of the land began in 1840 but it wasn’t until 1859 that the owners granted permission for the area to become a public pleasure ground. The 3 kilometres of land we know as our Upper, Central and Lower Gardens today didn’t all join as one garden until 1872.

There was a competition to design the Lower Pleasure Ground in 1871, the winner was Mr Philip Henry Tree. His design included new walks, plantations and flowerbeds. Improvements were carried out over the years but the biggest changes were in the 1920s when the Square was laid out and the pavilion was built in the Lower Gardens. Large ornamental rock gardens and small waterfalls were included along the park facing side of the pavilion. In 1922 the War Memorial was built in the Central Gardens and the rose beds were planted. The design and layout of the gardens hasn’t changed much since the 1870s. Lots of the trees and types of shrubs are still the same too.
Bournemouth: History of the Bournemouth Gardens

Beach & Bathing Station, Aberdeen


The Beach, Aberdeen
Postmarked 1914
Publisher: Catto & Watt, Aberdeen

Google Street View (as close as it can get).

The Sea Beach at Aberdeen Bay

The beach itself is famous for its golden sand and its long curved length between the harbour and the River Don’s mouth. The beach suffers from significant erosion of the sand so there are distinctive groyne or walls, to help keep the sand in place. The beach is popular with walkers, surfers and windsurfers.
Wikipedia.

The Bathing Station was designed by City Architect John Rust and was opened on the 13th July 1898. Above ground a distinctive red brick chimney dominated the beach skyline. The Bathing Station was an extremely popular venue all year round. The doors of the swimming baths were finally closed to the public on 11th July 1972, the pool itself being finally filled in and demolished.
Lost Aberdeen on Facebook

Tea House, Valley Gardens, Harrogate, North Yorkshire


The Tea House, Valley Gardens Harrogate.
Postmarked 1910
Publisher: Woolstone Brothers, London (1902-1933)

Google Street View.

Valley Gardens was developed as an attractive walk for visitors to the Spa town, part of their health regime between taking the waters, and as a means of access to the mineral springs of Bogs Field. The waterside walk with flowers and trees became a place for promenading, socialising and taking exercise. Photographs of the gardens in the early 20th century testify to their enormous popularity with crowds around the tea room, boating lake and bandstand. The Sun Pavilion and Colonnades were built as an added attraction and facility for the spa, intended as the first phase of a covered way linking the Pump Room and Royal Bath Hospital. Visitors to the mineral springs declined but the horticultural reputation of the Gardens grew with the staging of the Northern Horticultural Society’s Spring Flower Show in the Gardens and the addition of special garden areas. . . . A rustic thatched teahouse with veranda was erected on the slopes of the former Collins Field overlooking a bandstand sited near the new Magnesia Well pump room. . . . Plans were drawn up to redevelop the Pump Room at the entrance to Valley Gardens, create a covered colonnade following the north boundary beside Cornwall Road to a Sun Pavilion and develop a further link to the Royal Bath Hospital. The proposals involved the acquisition of the remaining privately owned properties at the entrance to the gardens and the replacement of the teahouse with the Sun Pavilion. The work was to be carried out in three phases, the first phase being the construction of the Sun Pavilion, colonnades and two sun parlours. Despite considerable opposition, notably by Duchy residents, the first phase was opened in June 1933.
Friends of Valley Gardens