Mosque of Mohamed Ali, Cairo


The Alabaster Mosk Mohamed Aly
Published: Lichtenstern & Harari 1902-1912

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Wikipedia.

The mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha is one of the most renowned historical and touristic landmarks in Egypt. The design for this mosque was derived from the Mosque of Sultan Ahmad in Istanbul (built AH 1025/AD 1616). Construction of the mosque began in AH 1246/AD 1830 and work continued on it, without interruption, until the death of Muhammad Ali Pasha in AH 1265/AD 1848. He was buried in a tomb that he had prepared for himself within the mosque in the southwestern corner. Construction of the walls, domes and minaret had been completed by the time of Ali Pasha’s death, and when ‘Abbas Pasha I assumed power (r. AH 1265–70/AD 1848–54), he ordered the completion of work on the marble, carvings and the gilding, and added a marble construction and a copper maqsura for Ali Pasha’s mausoleum.
Museum With No Frontiers: Discover Islamic Art

The mosque of Muhammad ‘Ali Pasha was built between 1828 and 1848. Perched on the summit of the citadel, this Ottoman mosque, the largest to be built in the first half of the 19th c., is, with its animated silhouette and twin minarets, the most visible mosque in Cairo. It is built on the site of Mamluk palaces destroyed at the behest of the patron, an act reminiscent of that of Saladin who wiped out all traces of Fatimid power by dismantling their palaces, and it also superseded the adjacent Mosque of al-Nasir Muhammad as the new state mosque. This first independent ruler of Egypt chose to build his state mosque entirely in the architectural style of his former overlords, the Ottomans, unlike the Mamluks who, despite their political submission to the Ottomans, tenaciously stuck to the architectural styles of the two Mamluk dynasties.
ArchNet


On back:
No. 418 Cairo: Interior of the Mosque of Mohammed Ali, built in 1830-1848. It is richly decorated and its walls are encrusted with alabaster from the quarries of Beni Suef.
Published: Eastern Publishing Company, Cairo


CAIRO – Mohamed Ali Mosque
c.1910
Published Lehnert & Landrock, Cairo

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Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, England


Winchester Cathedral, West Front

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By the early 16th century, much of the Cathedral you see today was complete. New secular names became linked to this place, to add to those of mighty kings and bishops, from the 17th-century angler Izaak Walton to the great early 19th-century English novelist Jane Austen.

The 19th century saw much restoration work, including new stone statues for the huge 15th-century Great Screen behind the altar. The Cathedral’s Organ, a cut-down version of a huge organ displayed at the 1851 Great Exhibition in London, was bought. By the early 1900s, there were fears that the east end of this ancient building would collapse, after centuries of subsidence. Deep-sea diver, William Walker, worked under water in total darkness for six years to stabilise them.

Today, after 12 centuries, this great Cathedral church remains the seat of the Bishop of Winchester and centre of the Diocese of Winchester. Its beautiful spaces continue to echo to the sound of daily prayers and glorious sacred music.
Winchester Cathedral.


Winchester Cathedral, Nave East
c.1910
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

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