Balliol College and Matyrs’ Memorial. Oxford, England


Oxford, Balliol College and Matyrs’ Memorial.
c.1910
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co

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Balliol has existed as a community of scholars on its present Broad Street site without interruption since about 1263. By this token it claims to be the oldest college in Oxford, and in the English-speaking world. In 1260 a dispute between John de Balliol and the Bishop of Durham erupted into violence and Henry III condemned Balliol’s behaviour. The Bishop had Balliol whipped, and imposed a penance on him of a substantial act of charity. This he did, by renting a property and creating a house of scholars, which was soon known by his name. After John de Balliol’s death in 1269, his widow, Dervorguilla of Galloway, guaranteed the future of the ‘House of the Scholars of Balliol’ by establishing a permanent endowment and giving it Statutes in 1282 – so bringing into being Balliol College as we know it today.
Balliol College

The Martyrs’ Memorial, designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott and built of magnesium limestone, has stood as a focal point at the south end of St Giles since its completion in 1843, when it replaced “a picturesque but tottering old house”. It was modelled on the Waltham Cross. The Martyrs’ Memorial was erected almost 300 years after the event it commemorates, and says as much about the religious controversies of the 1840s as those of the 1550s. It commemorates three Protestant martyrs (Cranmer, Ridley, and Latimer) who were burnt at the stake in Oxford in 1555.
Oxford History

Bridge of Sighs, Cambridge


The Bridge of Sighs, St. Johns College, Cambridge
Postmarked: 1904
Publisher: Henry Moss & Co, London

The Bridge of Sighs in Cambridge, England is a covered bridge at St John’s College, Cambridge University. It was built in 1831 and crosses the River Cam between the college’s Third Court and New Court. The architect was Henry Hutchinson.
Wikipedia.

St. John’s College.


Cambridge. Bridge of Sighs.
Postmarked: 1936
Publisher: Photocrom Co.

St John’s College, Cambridge


Cambridge. St John’s Gate & Divinity School.
Postmarked 1907
Publisher: Boots Cash Chemist

St John’s College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge (the full, formal name of the college is the College of St John the Evangelist in the University of Cambridge) founded by the Tudor matriarch Lady Margaret Beaufort. . . . The site was originally occupied by the Hospital of St John the Evangelist, probably founded around 1200. The hospital infirmary was located where the east end of the current chapel now stands. By 1470 Thomas Rotherham Chancellor of the university, extended to the hospital the privileges of membership of the university. This led to St. John’s House, as it was then known, being conferred the status of a college. By the early 16th century the hospital was dilapidated and suffering from a lack of funds. Lady Margaret Beaufort, having endowed Christ’s College sought to found a new college, and chose the hospital site at the suggestion of John Fisher, her chaplain and Bishop of Rochester. However, Lady Margaret died without having mentioned the foundation of St John’s in her will, and it was largely the work of Fisher that ensured that the college was founded. He had to obtain the approval of King Henry VIII of England, the Pope through the intermediary Polydore Vergil, and the Bishop of Ely to suppress the religious hospital, by which time held only a Master and three Augustinian brethren, and convert it to a college.

The college received its charter on 9 April 1511. Further complications arose in obtaining money from the estate of Lady Margaret to pay for the foundation and it was not until 22 October 1512 that a codicil was obtained in the court of the Archbishop of Canterbury. In November 1512 the Court of Chancery allowed Lady Margaret’s executors to pay for the foundation of the college from her estates. When Lady Margaret’s executors took over they found most of the old Hospital buildings beyond repair, but repaired and incorporated the Chapel into the new college. A kitchen and hall were added, and an imposing gate tower was constructed for the College Treasury. The doors were to be closed each day at dusk, sealing the monastic community from the outside world. Over the course of the following five hundred years, the college expanded westwards towards the River Cam, and now has twelve courts, the most of any Oxford or Cambridge College.
Wikipedia.

Bridge of Sighs.


Entrance Gate. St John’s College. Cambridge.
On back:
Entrance Gate, St. John’s College.–This is the second largest College in Cambridge, and was founded in 1511 on the site of St. John’s Hospital, which dated from the 12th century. Part of the College buildings overlook the river, which is spanned by two bridges belonging to St John’s, one the famous “Bridge of Sighs.”
Postmarked 1931.
Publisher: Raphael Tuck & Sons

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Queens’ College & Bridge, Cambridge


Queens’ College and Bridge, Cambridge
Postmarked: 1922
Publisher: Photochrom Co.

Queens’ College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. Queens’ is one of the oldest, largest and most prestigious colleges of the university, founded in 1448 by Margaret of Anjou, and has some of the most recognisable buildings in Cambridge. The college spans the river Cam, colloquially referred to as the “light side” and the “dark side”, with the Mathematical Bridge connecting the two.
Wikipedia.


Queen’s College Bridge, Cambridge
Dated & postmarked 1907

“Alumino” card with a metallic sheen, particularly on bridge and supports. This has been lost in scan.

King’s College, Cambridge


Cambridge, King’s College Screen and Gate.
Letter on back dated 1918
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

King’s College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England. Formally The King’s College of Our Lady and Saint Nicholas in Cambridge, the college lies beside the River Cam and faces out onto King’s Parade in the centre of the city. King’s was founded in 1441 by Henry VI soon after he had founded its sister college in Eton. However, the King’s plans for the college were disrupted by the Wars of the Roses and the resultant scarcity of funds, as well as his eventual deposition. Little progress was made on the project until in 1508 Henry VII began to take an interest in the college, most likely as a political move to legitimise his new position. The building of the college’s chapel, begun in 1446, was finally finished in 1544 during the reign of Henry VIII.

King’s College Chapel is regarded as one of the greatest examples of late Gothic English architecture. It has the world’s largest fan vault, while the chapel’s stained-glass windows and wooden chancel screen are considered some of the finest from their era.
Wikipedia.


King’s College Gateway, Cambridge.
Postmarked 1909.
Publisher: O. Flammel for Stengel & Co., London


Cambridge. King’s College Chapel.
Postmarked 1952.
Pubisher: Photochrom Co.

Jesus College, Cambridge


The Gateway, Jesus College, Cambridge.
Postmarked: 1935
“Pelham Real Photo Series”

Jesus College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. The college’s full name is The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund, near Cambridge. Its common name comes from the name of its chapel, Jesus Chapel. Jesus College was established between 1496 and 1516 on the site of the twelfth-century Benedictine nunnery of St Mary and St Radegund by John Alcock, then Bishop of Ely. The cockerel is the symbol of Jesus College, after the surname of its founder.
Wikipedia.


Jesus College, Cambridge.
Postmarked 1905.

Clare College, Cambridge


Cambridge. Clare College.
Dated & postmarked 1922
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

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Clare College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England. The college was founded in 1326 as University Hall, making it the second-oldest surviving college of the University after Peterhouse. It was refounded in 1338 as Clare Hall by an endowment from Elizabeth de Clare, and took on its current name in 1856. Clare is famous for its chapel choir and for its gardens on “The Backs” (the back of the colleges that overlook the River Cam).
Wikipedia


Clare College Bridge, Cambridge.
Postmarked 1906.

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