Certosa di Pavia, Lombardy, Italy


Certosa di Pavia – Lavabo del piccolo chiostro ed affresco del Bergognone.

On the back (in French, English & German):
CARTHUSIAN MONASTERY OF PAVIA: Place for washing in the small cloister and fresco by Bergognone.

Google Street View.

The Certosa di Pavia is a monastery and complex in Lombardy, northern Italy, situated near a small town of the same name in the Province of Pavia, 8 km north of Pavia. Built in 1396-1495, it was once located on the border of a large hunting park belonging to the Visconti family of Milan, of which today only scattered parts remain. It is one of the largest monasteries in Italy.
Wikipedia.

King’s College, Cambridge


Cambridge, King’s College Screen and Gate.
Letter on back dated 1918
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

King’s College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England. Formally The King’s College of Our Lady and Saint Nicholas in Cambridge, the college lies beside the River Cam and faces out onto King’s Parade in the centre of the city. King’s was founded in 1441 by Henry VI soon after he had founded its sister college in Eton. However, the King’s plans for the college were disrupted by the Wars of the Roses and the resultant scarcity of funds, as well as his eventual deposition. Little progress was made on the project until in 1508 Henry VII began to take an interest in the college, most likely as a political move to legitimise his new position. The building of the college’s chapel, begun in 1446, was finally finished in 1544 during the reign of Henry VIII.

King’s College Chapel is regarded as one of the greatest examples of late Gothic English architecture. It has the world’s largest fan vault, while the chapel’s stained-glass windows and wooden chancel screen are considered some of the finest from their era.
Wikipedia.


King’s College Gateway, Cambridge.
Postmarked 1909.
Publisher: O. Flammel for Stengel & Co., London


Cambridge. King’s College Chapel.
Postmarked 1952.
Pubisher: Photochrom Co.

Old St. John’s Church, Richmond, Virginia


Old St. John’s Church Interior, Richmond, Va.
In 1775 a convention was held in this historic church to deliberate upon the oppressive measures adopted by the British Government for enforcing the collection of taxes levied upon the Colonies. Many members of the convention hesitated to commit Virginia to any act of resistance, but Patrick Henry though only 39 years old, flashed the electric spark which exploded with fiery eloquence, “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of the chains of slavery? Forbid it Almighty God I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty or give me death.”

During the delivery of this immortal speech Henry stood in pew 72, now marked by white tablet shown in this view.

Postmarked 1946

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Tower of London, London


The Tower of London
1900s
Publisher: H. Vertigen & Co (1906-9)


I’ve marked the locations of the cards below on this map. (Click for larger version.) The base map comes from Hipkiss’s Scanned Old Maps

Postcards of Tower and river

Historic Royal Places: Tower of London (aimed at visitors)

UNESCO World Heritage Listing

Authorised Guide to the Tower of London, 1904 (on Project Gutenberg)

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, which is separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins), although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under kings Richard I, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.
Wikipedia

The Tower of London was founded by King William the Conqueror. After his coronation on Christmas Day, 1066, William hastily ordered the erection of a wooden fortress between the Thames and the ancient Roman wall which then surrounded London. William began the building of what is now termed as the White Tower ten years later. A rectangular stone keep of Caen stone, designed as an impregnable fortress and as an impressive and awesome demonstration of his power to the Londoners. With ramparts which were fifteen feet thick at the base and walls soaring ninety feet high, the dominating shadow of the Tower loomed forebodingly over the huddled wooden buildings of medieval London, a visible expression of Norman power.
English Monarchs: The Tower of London in the Middle Ages


On the back:
TOWER OF LONDON
The Middle tower
The Middle Tower forms the principal entrance to the Tower of London, and protects the bridge across the most. It is the only Tower outside the moat.</em?

MT on map
Google Street View.

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Mosque of Mohamed Ali, Cairo


The Alabaster Mosk Mohamed Aly
Published: Lichtenstern & Harari 1902-1912

Street View

Virtual Tour

Wikipedia.

The mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha is one of the most renowned historical and touristic landmarks in Egypt. The design for this mosque was derived from the Mosque of Sultan Ahmad in Istanbul (built AH 1025/AD 1616). Construction of the mosque began in AH 1246/AD 1830 and work continued on it, without interruption, until the death of Muhammad Ali Pasha in AH 1265/AD 1848. He was buried in a tomb that he had prepared for himself within the mosque in the southwestern corner. Construction of the walls, domes and minaret had been completed by the time of Ali Pasha’s death, and when ‘Abbas Pasha I assumed power (r. AH 1265–70/AD 1848–54), he ordered the completion of work on the marble, carvings and the gilding, and added a marble construction and a copper maqsura for Ali Pasha’s mausoleum.
Museum With No Frontiers: Discover Islamic Art

The mosque of Muhammad ‘Ali Pasha was built between 1828 and 1848. Perched on the summit of the citadel, this Ottoman mosque, the largest to be built in the first half of the 19th c., is, with its animated silhouette and twin minarets, the most visible mosque in Cairo. It is built on the site of Mamluk palaces destroyed at the behest of the patron, an act reminiscent of that of Saladin who wiped out all traces of Fatimid power by dismantling their palaces, and it also superseded the adjacent Mosque of al-Nasir Muhammad as the new state mosque. This first independent ruler of Egypt chose to build his state mosque entirely in the architectural style of his former overlords, the Ottomans, unlike the Mamluks who, despite their political submission to the Ottomans, tenaciously stuck to the architectural styles of the two Mamluk dynasties.
ArchNet


On back:
No. 418 Cairo: Interior of the Mosque of Mohammed Ali, built in 1830-1848. It is richly decorated and its walls are encrusted with alabaster from the quarries of Beni Suef.
Published: Eastern Publishing Company, Cairo


CAIRO – Mohamed Ali Mosque
c.1910
Published Lehnert & Landrock, Cairo

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