Villa Comunale/Public Gardens, Taormina, Messina, Italy


Taormina – Giardino Pubblico
(Public Garden)
c.1920
Publisher: Francesco Galifi (F. Galifi Crupi)

Google Street View (approximate).

Of all the colorful characters who have spent time in Taormina, the one leaving the biggest mark may have been Lady Florence Trevelyan, who in the late 19th century created these beautiful gardens, now the park also known as Parco Duca di Cesarò. Lady Trevelyan allegedly was asked to leave Britain after an entanglement with Edward, Prince of Wales, son of Queen Victoria. She settled in Taormina, married, and lived quite happily in the lovely, adjacent villa that is now the hotel Villa Paradiso.
Frommer’s

The Abbey Grotto, Gronant, Wales

The Abby Grotto. Gronant.

Publisher: Marimax Ltd, Colwyn Bay

Street View: Talacre Abbey

The next terrace contains the folly tower and grotto, both thought to be contemporary with the house (c. 1824). These can be reached by pathways just to the north-east of St Benedict’s Lodge or to the south-east of the house. The ruined folly tower is constructed of a mixture of brick and stone with a coating of mortar. In the basement floor are the remains of a shell room. A path leads around what appears to be the tumbled ruins of the tower, also of mortared stone and brick. The path continues around the pile of rubble, steps having been cut into the natural stone, and finally leads to the entrance of the grotto. This is built of the same material as the tower. It has several chambers connected by winding passageways. One of the chambers is open to the sky. Features include a (Mostyn) lion’s head with a hole for the mouth. A fire lit at the back of the hole could fill the ‘mouth’ with flame and smoke. There is also a cyclops, a ghostly figure delineated on a passage wall, and in the innermost chamber the headless life-sized figure of a seated monk.”
Archwilio.org

Temple of Love, Petit Trianon, Versailles, France

Master post for Versailles


VERSAILLES. — Hameau de Marie-Antoinette – Le Temple de l’Amour
Marie-Antoinette’s Hamlet – The Temple of Love.
Only publisher details: Editions d’Art “LYS”, Versailles, 9 Rue Colbert

This Temple of Love, which Marie-Antoinette could see from her room in the Petit Trianon, was erected by Richard Mique in 1778 in a neo-classical style. Fully decorated in marble, this precious building is especially remarkable for the quality of the sculptures by Deschamps which ornament the Corinthian capitals, the friezes and the inside of the dome.
Chateau of Versailles


 Le Temple de l’Amour — Temple of Love
Publisher: E. Papeghin, Paris


On back:
VERSAILLES (S.-et-O.)
416- Trianaon – Le Temple de l’Amour

Postmarked: 1955
Only publisher details: Editions d’Art A.P., 11 Rue Colbert, Versailles

Steps & Castle Ruins, Tintagel, England


The Steps. King Arthur’s Castle. TINTAGEL.
c.1950
Publisher: Frith

Google Street View.

History and legend are inseparable at Tintagel. From about the 5th to the 7th century AD it was an important stronghold, and probably a residence of rulers of Cornwall. Many fragments of luxury pottery imported from the Mediterranean were left behind by those who lived here. It was probably memories of this seat of Cornish kings that inspired the 12th-century writer Geoffrey of Monmouth to name it in his History of the Kings of Britain as the place where King Arthur was conceived, with the help of Merlin. At the same time, Cornish and Breton writers linked the love story of Tristan and Iseult with Tintagel. In turn, these associations with legend led the hugely rich and ambitious Richard, Earl of Cornwall, to build a castle here in the 1230s. The site was of no military value – legend alone seems to have inspired him to build here. And long after the castle had fallen into decay, its mythical associations kept interest in Tintagel alive.
English Heritage

In 1225, Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall traded with Gervase de Tintagel, swapping the land of Merthen (originally part of the manor of Winnianton) for Tintagel Castle. A castle was built on the site by Earl Richard in 1233 to establish a connection with the Arthurian legends that were associated by Geoffrey of Monmouth with the area and because it was seen as the traditional place for Cornish kings. The castle was built in a more old-fashioned style for the time to make it appear more ancient. . . . John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter was appointed constable of Tintagel Castle in 1389. After Richard, the following Earls of Cornwall were not interested in the castle, and it was left to the High Sheriff of Cornwall. Parts of the accommodation were used as a prison and the land was let as pasture. The castle became more dilapidated, and the roof was removed from the Great Hall in the 1330s. Thereafter, the castle became more and more ruinous and there was progressive damage from the erosion of the isthmus that joined the castle to the mainland.
Wikipedia.


Tintagel
Postmark: 1925
Publiser: Wakefield & Songs, Camelford