Palace of Fontainebleau, France


Palais de FONTAINEBLEAU – Cour des Adieux.

Google Street View.

Official Website
Media Center for Art History (panorama views of rooms)
17th century plan

Used by the kings of France from the 12th century, the hunting lodge of Fontainebleau, standing in the heart of the vast forest of the Ile-de-France in the Seine-et-Marne region, was transformed, enlarged and embellished in the 16th century by King François I, who wanted to make it a “new Rome”. Surrounded by an immense park, the palace, to which notable Italian artists contributed, combines Renaissance and French artistic traditions. The need to expand and decorate this immense palace created the conditions for the survival of a true artistic centre.

The construction of the palace began in 1528. The modifications undertaken later by François I’s successors and carried out on different scales until the 19th century have left their imprint on the physionomy of the present complex, which today comprises five courtyards placed in an irregular manner and surrounded by an ensemble of buildings and gardens.
UNESCO World Heritage listing


FONTAINEBLEAU — Le Palais. Perspective du Chateau et de l’Etang
1920s
Published Levy & Neurdein Reunis

Google Street View.


FONTAINEBLEAU. — Bateau de Prince Imperial. — LL
c.1910
Publisher: Levy Sons & Co. (1895-1919)

As the only child of Napoleon III and Empress Eugenie, Napoleon Eugène Louis Jean Joseph, the Imperial Prince, was particularly spoilt. The Emperor, who wanted to teach him the basics of navigation, ordered a frigate for him. Built by the Brest Arsenal’s workshops, it was given to the young prince in 1863, for his seventh birthday.
Chateau de Fontainebleua

A year earlier in 1863 Napoleon III almost certainly commissioned the small frigate that was given to his son, Napoleon Eugene Louis Giuseppe Bonaparte, the Imperial Prince (1856-1879.) Built at the arsenal at Brest, the boat was a present to the boy for his seventh birthday. 3.90 M long, with a beam of 1.10 M and 6 M high, the boat was a miniature reproduction of a XIX century ship. Its two bridges had 100 toy cannon along its sides, a helms wheel, an anchor, a bowsprit that was almost two metres long and complex rigging. The boat could be rowed by two or three people seated on benches below. Napoleon II and the Capatin Duperré used the boat to give the Imperial Prince his first lessons on navigation. Up to 1870 the fleet was just for the pleasure of the Royal Court. After the Prussians invaded, the fleet was transported to Saint-Cloud where it was unfortunately completely destroyed. The only boats left at Fontainebleau were Eugenia’s gondola and the Prince’s frigate. The gondola was sold in 1907 and the frigate was abandoned on the Pond for years until it was brought into the castle for restoration in 1926 under the direction of the architect Jean-Paul Alaux.
Save the Imperial Prince’s frigate! (pdf)

PALAIS DE FONTAINEBLEAU
Pavillon Louis XV – Entrée du Musée Chinois et l’Étang aux Carpes
Louis XV Pavilion – Entrance to the Chinese Museum and the carps pond.
Published by Musées Nationaux

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Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh


The Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh
c.1920
Publisher: Valentine

Google Maps.

The Palace of Holyroodhouse, commonly referred to as Holyrood Palace or Holyroodhouse, is the official residence of the British monarch in Scotland, Queen Elizabeth II. Located at the bottom of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, at the opposite end to Edinburgh Castle, Holyroodhouse has served as the principal royal residence in Scotland since the 16th century, and is now a setting for state occasions and official entertaining. . . .The palace as it stands today was built between 1671–1678 in a quadrangle layout, approximately 230 feet (70 m) from north to south and 230 feet (70 m) from east to west, with the exception of the 16th-century north-west tower built by James V. Sir William Bruce designed the 3-storey plus attic classical palace for Charles II, upon the restoration of the monarchy.
Wikipedia.


The Fountain, Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh
c.1920
Publisher: Valentine

The sundial to the north of the palace was carved in 1633 by John Mylne, while the fountain in the forecourt is a 19th-century replica of the 16th-century fountain at Linlithgow Palace.
Wikipedia.

The Builder of 6 March 1858 reported that ‘Sir Benjamin Hall, before he quitted the post of Chief Commissioner of Works, directed that the old fountain of Linlithgow Palace, erected in the time of James II., and which is celebrated for having run with wine on high festive occasions, be restored to its pristine form; to be placed in front of Holyrood Palace.’ According to The Art-Journal of 1860, the design of the fountain was drawn from ‘fragments of the old fountain which stood in the quadrangle of Linlithgow Palace [restored by Historic Scotland in 2005], so that the fountain is more a reproduction than an original design, the details having been taken from the fragments found’.
Cranmore

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Prince’s Palace of Monaco


Palais de Monaco, Chambre d’York
Palace of Monaco, York Room
c.1910

Following is the York Room, so named because the Duke of York, brother of King George III of England, who had been on a vessel near Monaco when he was taken ill, died there in 1787. Despite the gloomy history, the room itself has beautiful frescoes, which decorate this room, represent the four seasons and are the work of the Genovese artist Gregorio de Ferrari representing the four seasons.

The marble mosaic table in the center of this room is the one designated to signing official documents. The room is furnished with ornate ebony Florentine furniture from the 17th century, a Boulle clock and royal portraits.
Palais Princier de Monaco


MONACO. Palais du Prince Salon d’York
York’s saloon in Prince’s Palace

Despite the caption. this looks more like the Blue Room, albeit with different patterned wallpaper, at the bottom of the web page

The room opens on to the Blue Room, which is used for official receptions. It received its name because the walls are lined with blue silk brocade. In it are Grimaldi portraits, 19th century Italian gilt and the dazzling Venetian chandeliers.
Palais Princier de Monaco

Google Maps.

Hampton Court Palace, England


Hampton Court Palace,  West Front
Postmarked & dated 1905.

Street View

The original Tudor Hampton Court Palace was begun by Cardinal Wolsey in the early 16th century, but it soon attracted the attention of Henry VIII, who brought all his six wives here. Surrounded by gorgeous gardens and famous features such as the Maze and the Great Vine, the palace has been the setting for many nationally important events. When William III and Mary II (1689-1702) took the throne in 1689, they commissioned Sir Christopher Wren to build an elegant new baroque palace. Later, Georgian kings and princes occupied the splendid interiors. When the royals left in 1737, impoverished ‘grace and favour’ aristocrats moved in.
Historic Royal Palaces

Building of the palace began in 1515 for Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, a favourite of King Henry VIII. In 1529, as Wolsey fell from favour, the cardinal gave the palace to the king to check his disgrace. The palace went on to become one of Henry’s most favoured residences; soon after acquiring the property, he arranged for it to be enlarged so that it might more easily accommodate his sizeable retinue of courtiers. Along with St James’ Palace, it is one of only two surviving palaces out of the many the king owned. The palace is currently in the possession of Queen Elizabeth II and the Crown. In the following century, King William III’s massive rebuilding and expansion work, which was intended to rival the Palace of Versailles, destroyed much of the Tudor palace. His work ceased in 1694, leaving the palace in two distinct contrasting architectural styles, domestic Tudor and Baroque
Wikipedia.


Hampton Court Palace
The Great Gatehouse and the Bridge (Early 16th century), showing the King’s Beasts.
Postmarked 1953
Publisher: Ministry of Works, London

In 1796, the Great Hall was restored and in 1838, during the reign of Queen Victoria, the restoration was completed and the palace opened to the public. The heavy-handed restoration plan at this time reduced the Great Gatehouse, the palace’s principal entrance, by two storeys and removed the lead cupolas adorning its four towers.
Wikipedia.

There are ten statues of heraldic animals, called the King’s Beasts, that stand on the bridge over the moat leading to the great gatehouse. Unlike the Queen’s Beasts in Kew Gardens, these statues represent the ancestry of King Henry VIII and his third wife Jane Seymour. The animals are: the lion of England, the Seymour lion, the Royal dragon, the black bull of Clarence, the yale of Beaufort, the white lion of Mortimer, the White Greyhound of Richmond, the Tudor dragon, the Seymour panther, and the Seymour unicorn. The set of Queens Beasts at the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II replaced the three Seymour items and one of the dragons by the griffin of Edward III, the horse of Hanover, the falcon of the Plantagenets, and the unicorn of Scotland.
Wikipedia.

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Tower of London, London


The Tower of London
1900s
Publisher: H. Vertigen & Co (1906-9)


I’ve marked the locations of the cards below on this map. (Click for larger version.) The base map comes from Hipkiss’s Scanned Old Maps

Postcards of Tower and river

Historic Royal Places: Tower of London (aimed at visitors)

UNESCO World Heritage Listing

Authorised Guide to the Tower of London, 1904 (on Project Gutenberg)

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, which is separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins), although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under kings Richard I, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.
Wikipedia

The Tower of London was founded by King William the Conqueror. After his coronation on Christmas Day, 1066, William hastily ordered the erection of a wooden fortress between the Thames and the ancient Roman wall which then surrounded London. William began the building of what is now termed as the White Tower ten years later. A rectangular stone keep of Caen stone, designed as an impregnable fortress and as an impressive and awesome demonstration of his power to the Londoners. With ramparts which were fifteen feet thick at the base and walls soaring ninety feet high, the dominating shadow of the Tower loomed forebodingly over the huddled wooden buildings of medieval London, a visible expression of Norman power.
English Monarchs: The Tower of London in the Middle Ages


On the back:
TOWER OF LONDON
The Middle tower
The Middle Tower forms the principal entrance to the Tower of London, and protects the bridge across the most. It is the only Tower outside the moat.</em?

MT on map
Google Street View.

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Red Fort, Delhi


Scale of Justice, Fort Delhi 
Caption: Interior Scale of Justice Fort Delhi. A marvel of whithe[?] marble with colouring of an unrivalled beauty.
Larger version

Red Fort constructed 1639-48 for Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan.

“The Red fort contains all the paraphernalia of the Mughal dynasty including the halls of public and private audience (‘Diwan-i-Am’ and ‘Diwan-i-Khas’), domed and arched marble palaces, plush private apartments, a mosque (Moti Masjid) and richly designed gardens. While the emperor would hear complaints of his subjects at the ‘Diwan-i-Am’, he held private meetings at the ‘Diwan-i-Khas’. The fort also houses the Royal Bath or the ‘Hammam’, the ‘Shahi Burj’ (Shah Jahan’s private working area) and the famous Pearl Mosque, built by Aurangzeb. In the ‘Rang Mahal’ or the Palace of Colors, lived the Emperor’s wives and mistresses.” (From Cultural India.)

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