Temple of the Goddess Hather, Dendera Temple Complex, Egypt


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Dendera. Temple of the Goddess Hather.
Published: Gaddis & Seif, Luxor

Google Street View.

Wikimedia Commons: Floor plans of temple, plan of complex in German & plan of complex in French

Dendera Temple complex is located about 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) south-east of Dendera, Egypt. It is one of the best-preserved temple complexes in Egypt. . . . he dominant building in the complex is the Temple of Hathor. The temple has been modified on the same site starting as far back as the Middle Kingdom, and continuing right up until the time of the Roman emperor Trajan. The existing structure began construction in the late Ptolemaic period, and the hypostyle hall was built in the Roman period under Tiberius.
Wikipedia

Hathor was a major goddess in the ancient Egyptian pantheon , who personified the principles of joy, feminine love, and motherhood, and her cult center was at Dendera, one of the best-preserved temple complexes in all of Egypt. The Temple of Hathor is the largest and most impressive buildings in this religious complex, and is visually stunning with its grand entrance, detailed carvings, hieroglyphs, and decorated ceilings.
The Magnificent Temple of Hathor, Goddess of Love: Best Preserved Temple in all of Egypt

The Temple of Hathor is one of the most well-preserved temples in all of Egypt. There are three temples to view in the complex: the birthing temple at the front, the temple of Isis behind the main temple, and the main temple dedicated to Hathor. There is also a sacred pool that you can still explore.
Atlas Obscura

Enclosed within the precincts of the Dendera complex are a sacred lake, a temple of the goddess Isis, and a brick sanatorium where divine healing was practiced. There is also an early Christian church that typifies the situation in so many Egyptian temples, whose sacred precincts were usurped by the Christians. Within the main temple it is interesting to study the beautiful and highly detailed astrological calendars carved and painted upon the ceilings. Visitors may wonder about the blackened condition of other ceilings in the temple. When Napolean’s scholars first visited Dendera they found a centuries-old Arab village firmly established inside the great temple; the villagers’ cooking fires had blackened the ceilings over the years.
Dendera, Egypt : Temple of the Goddess Hathor

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