Hotel Danieli, Venice


Hötel Royal Danieli – Venise
Approdo dalla riva e Vestibolo

Published G. Zanetti, Venezia

Street View (exterior)
Street view (inside)

Synonymous with the splendour of Venice, the Hotel Danieli is considered one of the most famous hotels in the world. Its remarkable history begins in the 14th century when the hotel’s main building—the Palazzo Dandolo—was commissioned by the noble Venetian family Dandolo. Of the four Dandolos that served as the Doge of Venice, Enrico garnered the greatest fame when he conquered Constantinople in 1204 and returned to the city with a bounty of gold, marble and Byzantine artwork, some of which was later incorporated into the Palazzo Dandolo’s interiors.

Several centuries later, in 1822, Giuseppe Dal Niel rented part of the palazzo and converted it into a hotel, renaming it after his nickname “Danieli”. Little by little he bought all the floors and finally became sole owner. It was in the winter of 1833, that the scandalous love affair between George Sand and Alfred de Musset unfolded in Room 10.

In 1895, Mr. Genovesi and the Campi Bozzi & C. become the new owners of the hotel. They completed expensive renovations, adding electrical power, vapour radiators, and elevators to further the hotel’s reputation for luxurious accommodation. At this time, the hotel was also connected via bridge to the Casa Nuova Palace—the former seat of the Customs office—located across the Rio del Vin.
Hotel Danieli, a Luxury Collection Hotel, Venice

Natural History Museum, London


South Kensington Museum, London
c. 1910

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Natural History Museum, South Kensington
Domestic animals and bird room

c.1910 (TuckDB)

The North Hall, or that portion of the building situated to northward of the principal staircase, is intended for the Domesticated Animals, as well as examples of Hybrids and other Abnormalities.

The chief exhibits comprise Horses, Cattle, Sheep, Goats, Dogs, and Rabbits. One of the main objects of this series is to show the leading characteristics of the well-established breeds, both British and foreign. In addition to Domesticated Animals properly so called, there are also exhibited examples of what may be termed Semi-Domesticated Animals, such as white or parti-coloured Rats and Mice.

Among the Sheep, attention may be directed to the four-homed and fat-tailed breeds, and also to the small breed from the island of Soa, as well as the curious spiral-homed Wallachian Sheep. The so-called wild cattle of Chillingham Park are included in this series, since they are not truly wild animals, but are descended from a domesticated breed. The celebrated greyhound “Fullerton” is shown among the series of Dogs, which also comprises two fine examples of the Afghan Greyhound. Small-sized models of Cattle, Horses, Sheep, and Pigs also form a feature of the series. A hybrid between the Zebra and the Ass is shown in one of the cases
A general guide to the British museum (Natural history) (1908)