British Infantry Lines, Belgaum


The British Infantry Lines, Belgaum

Not dated. Roughly about 1910. Published S. Mahadeo & Son

The city served as a major military installation for the British Raj, primarily due to its proximity to Goa, which was then a Portuguese territory. Once the British left India, the Indian government continued and still continues to have armed forces installations in Belgaum.

Belgaum’s salubrious climate, proximity to the coast and strategic position near Portuguese Goa commended it to the British as a suitable location for an army training centre and cantonment, which it continues to be today for the Indian Armed Forces, along with an air force station of the Indian Air Force. The British had a sizeable infantry post here, having realised the military importance of its geographical location.

Wikipedia.


This map of Belgaum (from Wikipedia Commons) shows the location of various military camps around the city (which can be match to locations on Google Maps (e.g. “New Artillery Barracks” is the same area as “BM School Playground”). Which particular camp the postcard is showing is a little harder to determine.

Casino de Monte Carlo, Monaco


Monte-Carlo. — Le Casino. — LL.
Published: Levy & Sons, c.1910

Street View

The idea of opening a gambling casino in Monaco belongs to Princess Caroline, a shrewd, business-minded spouse of Prince Florestan I. Revenues from the proposed venture were supposed to save the House of Grimaldi from bankruptcy. The ruling family’s persistent financial problems became especially acute after the loss of tax revenue from two breakaway towns, Menton and Roquebrune, which declared independence from Monaco in 1848 and refused to pay taxes on olive oil and fruit imposed by the Grimaldis.

In 1854, Charles, Florestan’s son and future Prince of Monaco, recruited a team of Frenchmen—writer Albert Aubert and businessman Napoleon Langlois—to devise a development plan and write a prospectus to attract 4 million francs needed to build a spa for the treatment of various diseases, a gambling casino modeled from the Bad Homburg casino, and English-styled villas. Granted the concession of 30 years to operate a bathing establishment and gaming tables, Aubert and Langlois opened the first casino at 14 December 1856 in Villa Bellevu. Intended to be only a temporary location, the building was a modest mansion in La Condamine.

In the late 1850s, Monaco was an unlikely place for a resort to succeed. The lack of roads needed to connect Monaco to Nice and the rest of Europe, and the absence of comfortable accommodations for visitors, as well as the concessionaires’ failure to publicize the new resort, resulted in far fewer customers than was originally anticipated. Unable to raise the capital needed to operate the money-losing enterprise, Aubert and Langlois ceded their rights to Frossard de Lilbonne, who in turn passed it to Pierre Auguste Daval in 1857.
[continued]
Wikipedia

Website.
Virtual tour (once inside, the grid in the top left is the easiest way to get around).


Casino de Monte Carlo.– Autour de la Roulette. –LL
Roulette Table c.1915
Salle Europe.


Casino de Monte Carlo, Salle Touzet (Trente et Quarante)
c.1920

Salle Touzet Nord

Trente et Quarante (Thirty & Forty) is a French card game Wikipedia article.


Monte-Carlo. — Façade nord du Casino.

Published Neurdien & Co, Paris. (1916-1918 or pre-1919)

London Bridge, London


London Bridge after the 1904 widening. Copyright G. D & D. L.
c.1910
Publisher: Gottschalk, Dreyfuss & Davis, 1909-1915
(Image is crooked on card)

Bridge built 1831, widened 1902, removed 1968

Approximate location, Google Street View.
Tower on the right is St Magus the Martyr and the white building with columns just to the left of the bridge is Fishmongers’ Hall

Wikipedia
London Bridge Museum & Educational Trust (might have to increase zoom on broswer to make page bigger)

Kohfukuji, Nara


Pagoda of Kofukuji and Hananomatsu, Nara
松の花及塔重五寺福興良奈

Five-storied pagoda in the Kohfukuji Buddhist temple complex. Hananomatsu is the tree.

Google Street View

Kofukuji used to be the family temple of the Fujiwara, the most powerful aristocratic clan during much of the Nara and Heian Periods. The temple was established in Nara at the same time as the capital in 710. At the height of Fujiwara power, the temple consisted of over 150 buildings.
Japan-guide.com

Nara was the capital of Japan from 710 to 784. During this period the framework of national government was consolidated and Nara enjoyed great prosperity, emerging as the fountainhead of Japanese culture.
Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara (UNESCO)

The Five-Story Pagoda, which was completely restored in 1426, is the second tallest pagoda in Japan at 50.1m, behind the 55m-tall pagoda at Toji Temple in Kyoto. The pagoda had burnt down no less than five times before the 15th century.
Japan Visitor

From the temple website:

History of Kohfukuji
In the eighth year of the reign of Emperor Tenji (669 CE), Kagami no Okimi, consort of the statesman Nakatomi (Fujiwara) no Kamatari, founded a Buddhist chapel on the family estate in Yamashina Suehara (in modern-day Kyoto Prefecture) to pray for Kamatari’s recovery from illness. In this temple, which came to be known as Yamashinadera, Kagami no Okimi enshrined a Shaka triad (Sakyamuni, the historical Buddha, along with two attendant Bodhisattvas) that had originally been commissioned by Kamatari. In the wake of the relocation of the capital as a result of the Jinshin Rebellion of 672, the temple was disassembled and moved to Umayasaka in Nara prefecture, where it was re-erected and named Umayasakadera.

Shortly after the establishment of the Heijo Capital in 710, Yamashinadera relocated to its present location in what is now the city of Nara. The temple, now called Kohfukuji (“The Temple that Generates Blessings”), grew rapidly in size under the patronage of successive emperors and empresses, as well as continued support from members of the powerful Fujiwara family. Over time, it developed a particularly close connection with the “Northern House” of the Fujiwara clan, under whose sponsorship it accumulated sufficient wealth and power to rank as one of the “Four Great Temples” of the Nara Period (710-784) and one of the “Seven Great Temples” of the Heian Period (794-1180).
The Kohfukuji Temple Complex

THE FIVE-STORIED PAGODA
The five-storied pagoda was originally erected in 730 by Empress Komyo, the daughter of Kohfukuji’s founding patron, Fujiwara no Fuhito. Over its long history, the building burned down a total of five times, with the current reconstruction dating to around the year 1426. At a total height of 50.1 meters, it is the second tallest wooden pagoda in Japan today. Famous for its deep eaves, the structure successfully blends references to Nara-period architecture with the dynamic architectural style of the medieval period. The original Nara-period building is thought to have risen to a height of around 45 meters, making it the tallest man-made structure in Japan at the time.

The Kohfukuji Temple Complex: the Five Storied Pagoda

Hananomatsu
On the stone monument is written “Monument of Hananomatsu”.
Actually, there was a pine tree in front of the Tokondo hall.
It was called Hananomatsu.
It is said that the pine trees were planted by Kobo Daishi.
Kobo Daishi is the posthumous name of the priest called Kukai about 1,200 years ago.
Kukai is the one who opened a new sect of Buddhism called Shingon sect.
For this reason, he has a name that respects Kobo Daishi.
The pine grew big, but it withered in 1937.
In 1940, successor pine was planted.
But that pine withered in 2008.
Thereafter, pines have not been planted there.

Tourist Spots in Kyoto, Nara, Osaka

Wikipedia
Wikipedia Commons

Elisha’s Spring, Jericho


JERICO
Fontaine d’Elisee
Elisas’s fountain
Elizaquelle

Date: not sure. Maybe 1920s

Approximate location.

And the men of the city said unto Elisha, Behold, I pray thee, the situation of this city is pleasant, as my lord seeth: but the water is naught, and the ground barren. And he said, Bring me a new cruse, and put salt therein. And they brought it to him. And he went forth unto the spring of the waters, and cast the salt in there, and said, Thus saith the Lord, I have healed these waters; there shall not be from thence any more death or barren land. So the waters were healed unto this day, according to the saying of Elisha which he spake.
2 Kings 2:19-22 (King James Version)

Elisha’s Spring (also called the Prophet’s Fountain and Elisha’s Fountain) is a fresh water spring near the archaeological mound of Tel Jericho where remains of settlements were found dating back to about 8,000 BC. The people who settled here so long ago would have done so to take advantage of the fresh water which is such a scarcity in the harsh desert environment just north of the Dead Sea. Elisha’s Spring makes Jericho an oasis or City of Palms in the otherwise dry surroundings. The perennial spring continues to produce plenty of water which has a temperature of 26˚C.
Bein Harim Tourism Services

Life in the Holy Land

Images on Wikimedia Commons (more under the Ein El Sultan category)>

Agra Fort, India


The Fort, Agra
c.1910
Publisher: Moorli Dhur & Sons

Agra Fort was built in the year 1573 under the reign of Akbar – one of the greatest Mughal Emperors. It took more than 4000 workers and eight years of hardship to complete the fort. Knowing the significance of its location, Akbar built the fort to make it the main residence of the Mughals. The fort remained as the main residence of the emperors belonging to the Mughal dynasty until the year 1638. The fort houses numerous impressive structures like the Jahangir Mahal, Khas Mahal, Diwan-i-Khass, Diwan-i-Am, Machchhi Bhawan and Moti Masjid. In 1638, the capital of the Mughal dynasty was moved from Agra to Delhi, causing the Agra Fort to lose its status as the main residence of the Mughal emperors.
Cultural India: Agra Fort

Wikipedia (Agra Fort)
Maps: 1901 & 1909
Google Maps.


The Fort. Agra.
c.1910

Read moreAgra Fort, India

Meiji Shrine, Tokyo


門 神 南 (神宫治明)

(That last part seems to be written backwards? I don’t know Japanese. My best guess is:)
South/Minami Gate (Meiji Jingu)

1921-1946

Google Maps.

After the emperor’s death in 1912, the Japanese Diet passed a resolution to commemorate his role in the Meiji Restoration. An iris garden in an area of Tokyo where Emperor Meiji and Empress Shōken had been known to visit was chosen as the building’s location.

Construction began in 1915 under Itō Chūta, and the shrine was built in the traditional nagare-zukuri style, using primarily Japanese cypress and copper. The building of the shrine was a national project, mobilizing youth groups and other civic associations from throughout Japan, who contributed labor and funding. It was formally dedicated in 1920, completed in 1921, and its grounds officially finished by 1926.

The original building was destroyed during the Tokyo air raids of World War II.
Wikipedia

Official website (uses Flash)