Pool of London


Tate Gallery — Pool of London — G. Vicat Cole. R. A.

This is a postcard of a painting, The Pool of London by George Vicat Cole (1888) in the Tate Gallery. The card is about 25 years later.

This view seems to be just west of London Bridge (rougly here), because if it was east, you’d be able to see a bridge. (I think the Southwark Bridge predecessor is hidden by ships.)

A pool (in this context) is a deep and still place in a river – and thus a good place to moor a boat. London’s pool is divided into upper and lower parts, which are respectively west and east of Tower Bridge. For centuries, cargo vessels traded at riverside wharves in and around the City of London. When these quays grew increasingly overcrowded many boats took to mooring in midstream and loading or unloading with the assistance of barges. The Pool was a perennial forest of bobbing masts. As early as 1586 William Camden boasted: “A man would say, that seeth the shipping there, that it is, as it were, a very wood of trees disbranched to make glades and let in light, so shaded it is with masts and sails.”

As Britain’s empire expanded and the industrial revolution took hold, the Pool became the busiest section of river in the world, crammed not just with ocean-going ships bearing exotic produce from foreign lands, but boats full of immigrants and emigrants, skiffs bringing oysters and fish from the Thames estuary or North Sea, and colliers transporting coal from Tyneside. The first police force was formed at the end of the 18th century to prevent theft and fraud in the Pool of London. Around this time the riverbanks began to fill with imposing warehouses, several of which survive, notably at Butler’s Wharf and Hay’s Wharf on the south shore of the Upper Pool. With the construction of inland docks such as West India and East India, and later Royal Victoria and Royal Albert, the largest ships found new berths but the Pool remained a hive of activity until the ineluctable decline of London as a port in the mid-20th century.
Hidden London

Wikipedia

London Bridge, London


London Bridge after the 1904 widening. Copyright G. D & D. L.

c.1910
(According to MetroPostcards, Gottschalk, Dreyfuss & Davis Co., Ltd. (G. D & D. L.) were in operation 1909 to 1915.)

Bridge built 1831, widened 1902, removed 1968

Approximate location, Google Street View.
Tower on theright is St Magus the Martyr and the white building with columns just to the left of the bridge is Fishmongers’ Hall

Wikipedia
London Bridge Museum & Educational Trust (might have to increase zoom on brower to make page bigger)

Elisha’s Spring, Jericho


JERICO
Fontaine d’Elisee
Elisas’s fountain
Elizaquelle

Date: not sure. Maybe 1920s

Approximate location.

And the men of the city said unto Elisha, Behold, I pray thee, the situation of this city is pleasant, as my lord seeth: but the water is naught, and the ground barren. And he said, Bring me a new cruse, and put salt therein. And they brought it to him. And he went forth unto the spring of the waters, and cast the salt in there, and said, Thus saith the Lord, I have healed these waters; there shall not be from thence any more death or barren land. So the waters were healed unto this day, according to the saying of Elisha which he spake.
2 Kings 2:19-22 (King James Version)

Elisha’s Spring (also called the Prophet’s Fountain and Elisha’s Fountain) is a fresh water spring near the archaeological mound of Tel Jericho where remains of settlements were found dating back to about 8,000 BC. The people who settled here so long ago would have done so to take advantage of the fresh water which is such a scarcity in the harsh desert environment just north of the Dead Sea. Elisha’s Spring makes Jericho an oasis or City of Palms in the otherwise dry surroundings. The perennial spring continues to produce plenty of water which has a temperature of 26˚C.
Bein Harim Tourism Services

Life in the Holy Land

Images on Wikimedia Commons (more under the Ein El Sultan category)>

Stock Exchange, Copenhagen


København — Børsen

On back:
Alex Vincent’s Kunsuorlag, Eneberettiget, No. 14

Postmarked 1911

Google Street View

From
The Old Stock Exchange dates back to 1625 and is one of the oldest buildings in Copenhagen. King Christian IV had realized the importance of increased trade and commerce, and so he had this grand building erected. At the time of its inauguration, the building had room for at least 40 market stalls. The Old Stock Exchange was then surrounded by water from three sides, so ships could unload their cargo directly at the wharf in front.

Roof turned to canon balls during war

The Old Stock Exchange was built in Dutch Renaissance style. King Christian IV had originally covered the roof with lead, but during the Swedish occupation of Copenhagen 1658-59, much of this lead was removed to produce cannon balls, and the holes in the roof were only partly covered with tin and tile. Not until the end of the 19th century was the building roofed with copper.

The four intertwined dragon tails of the dragon spire are topped by three crowns, symbolizing the Scandinavian empire (Denmark, Norway, and Sweden).

From Børsbygningen:
Børsen is one of the old buildings in Copenhagen and like Rosenborg Slot and Rundetårn, it is one of the buildings of which we remember King Christian IV. The building is built in Dutch renaissance style but is characterized by the King’s taste, like the garrets on the roof and the spire.

In 1618 Christian IV asked the engineer Johan Semb to construct a new part of town, Christianshavn, and a dam was made facing Amager on top of which, the first “Amagerbro” (today known as Knippelsbro) was built. Christian IV had realized the importance of trade and business and decided to make Copenhagen the great trade centre and grand city of the future. However, you cannot have a grand city without an exchange and in 1618 the King asked Lorenz van Steenwinckel to start building Børsen, where the dam facing Christianshavn is connected with land on Slotsholmen.
..
Børsen as a market place In the late 16th twenties, Børsen was taken into use by renting out booths for merchants. From the street you could enter the ground floor and visit 40 booths. The whole of Børsen’s first floor contained only one big room with rented booths in the centre and along the windows.
(More information and photos of rooms.)

Wikipedia

Groudle Glen, Isle of Man


The Water Wheel, Groudle Glen, Isle of Man

On the back is printed:
British Empire Exhibition
Manx Kiosk, London —– 192-
Having a good time here but expect to have a better when I meet you in the Isle of Man.

Issued by the Isle of Man (Official) Board of Advertising and Information Free from C. P. Clague, Secretary.

1920s. (British Empire Exhibition was 1924-25)

Google Maps.

From Isle of Man: Groudle Glen, via the Wayback Machine:
In the year 1890, an enterprising businessman by the name of Mr. Richard Maitby Broadbent who owned the Bibaloe Beg farm in Onchan, purchased the lease for the whole of the Groudle Glen area from The Howstrake Estate. At that time the glen was in its natural state with grass, ferns and very few trees, indeed when the glen first opened to the public it was known as “The Fern Glen of the Isle of Man”.

The development of the glen continued with trees being planted and the trademark rustic bridges built across the river. A pathway was made from the entrance beside the hotel to a rocky inlet approximately half a mile around the headlands. The inlet was a perfect natural bowl, sheltered from the winds and it was decided to use it to its full potential by creating a sea-lion pool. To achieve this, the inlet was dammed and closed off, so creating a lovely pool area in which to house not only the sea-lions but even a polar bear. …
Broadbent then hit on the idea of introducing yet another attraction, a narrow (two-foot) gauge railway to run from the inner glen to the sea-lion pool. The little railway was completed in 1896, using entirely local labour. Shortly after, Mr. Broadbent took delivery of a small locomotive, aptly named the “Sea-lion”, along with three small coaches, which had arrived from England. It was to be advertised in the local press and guide books as the world’s smallest railway.

The polar bears were retired during the Great War. Their keeper at the time, Mr. Fred Kelly who lived in the cottage, the ruins of which can still be seen at the lower entrance to the glen, he had been under instructions to shoot them, but was unable to face the task, however we do not know the final outcome. The second World War saw the closure of the pool, and the sea-lions released.

Unfortunately when the line reopened in 1946 the Groudle company suffered badly at the hands of what had become a new post-war phenomenon, vandals. With a landslide on the headland making it impossible for the trains to reach the pool and the added fact that the sea lions were not replaced, it was decided to close the line.

Water Wheel

The glen has a water wheel and wheelhouse, which were first operated in about 1895. The wheel provided power for the glen’s fairy lights, and water was pumped up the glen to the hotel at the top. Later in its life, it was to become a feature in a well known 1986 BBC TV series called ‘Lovejoy”.

Images on Wikipedia Commons (more recent photos)

Isle of Man: Things to do