Mont Orgueil Castle, Jersey


Mont Orgueil Castle I — Jersey — Château du Mont Orgueil I
c.1910
Pictorial Stationary Co. (1897-1914)

Street View

Jersey Heritage: video tour

Mont Orgueil has been set onto its rocky outcrop above the town of Gorey since 1212. At the time, it was a state-of-the-art stronghold, and its construction was a matter of urgency. In 1204, Normandy – which lies just 17 miles to the east – had been seized by France, having been tied to the English crown since the Norman Conquest of 1066. What had been a friendly neighbour was suddenly the foe next door, and Mont Orgueil had a job to do, monitoring the Channel for any signs of enemy action. It never fell into French hands.

Although its soaring towers and sturdy walls were the best defence that money could build in the 13th century, by the 15th Mont Orgueil was obsolete, thanks to the hilly terrain which surrounds it – a landscape which left it open to cannon fire now that gunpowder had been invented.
The Telegraph: Five reasons why visiting Mont Orgueil in Jersey is a must

The castle is built on a rocky promontory facing the coast of Normandy and overlooking the Bay of Grouville. There are steep slopes and high cliffs on three sides giving an almost impregnable position. In 1204, King Philip of France took Normandy back but King John of England kept the administration of the islands. The Channel Islands became the front line between England and France and work began on Mont Orgueil under the Warden of the Isles, Hasculf du Suligny.

The site chosen had been used as a defensive place since the Iron Age and possibly as early as the Neolithic period. The earth rampart and ditch would have been degraded but would have provided a good start for the new fortress which was built on the rocky ridge. The shape of the stone buildings was determined by the narrowness of the ridge, with a hall being connected to two square towers by long passageways. Access to the hall was through an enclosed staircase. The area inside the ramparts below was further strengthened in 1224-5 when 1,000 tree trunks were sent to the islands from the New Forest to make palisades for the two new castles. In addition Jersey also received five cartloads of lead, the timber from 20 oak trees and 60 bags of nails to assist with the building.
The Island Wiki

Gatehouse Gazetter

Wikipedia

Harbour, Ramsgate, England


The Harbour, Ramsgate
On wall:
Pleasure yachts leaving Ramsgate harbour
Postmarked: 1908
Publisher: Regal Art Publishing Co, London

Google Street View.

The construction of Ramsgate Harbour began in 1749 and was completed in about 1850. The two most influential architects of the harbour were father and son John Shaw and John Shaw Jr, who designed the clockhouse, the obelisk, the lighthouse and the Jacob’s Ladder steps. The harbour has the unique distinction of being the only harbour in the United Kingdom awarded the right to call itself a Royal Harbour. This was bestowed by King George IV after he was taken by the hospitality shown by the people of Ramsgate when he used the harbour to depart and return with the Royal Yacht Squadron in 1821. Because of its proximity to mainland Europe, Ramsgate was a chief embarkation point both during the Napoleonic Wars and for the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940. The ferry terminal area is built upon reclaimed land.
Wikipedia

Boat Harbour, Lyttelton, New Zealand


Boat Harbour, Lyttleton
Letter on back dated 21/1/09

“Dear Selo
“I arrived safe so far I sent you a shell from the bluf I did not send any any post card one day in Bluf Dunedin Littleton Christchurch now in Wellington leave tonight for Gisborne then Napier & Auckland I havent missed a meal yet nor been sea sick
“Love to all I remain your Affectionate Bill”

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Pool of London


Tate Gallery — Pool of London — G. Vicat Cole. R. A.

This is a postcard of a painting, The Pool of London by George Vicat Cole (1888) in the Tate Gallery. The card is about 25 years later.

This view seems to be just west of London Bridge (rougly here), because if it was east, you’d be able to see a bridge. (I think the Southwark Bridge predecessor is hidden by ships.)

A pool (in this context) is a deep and still place in a river – and thus a good place to moor a boat. London’s pool is divided into upper and lower parts, which are respectively west and east of Tower Bridge. For centuries, cargo vessels traded at riverside wharves in and around the City of London. When these quays grew increasingly overcrowded many boats took to mooring in midstream and loading or unloading with the assistance of barges. The Pool was a perennial forest of bobbing masts. As early as 1586 William Camden boasted: “A man would say, that seeth the shipping there, that it is, as it were, a very wood of trees disbranched to make glades and let in light, so shaded it is with masts and sails.”

As Britain’s empire expanded and the industrial revolution took hold, the Pool became the busiest section of river in the world, crammed not just with ocean-going ships bearing exotic produce from foreign lands, but boats full of immigrants and emigrants, skiffs bringing oysters and fish from the Thames estuary or North Sea, and colliers transporting coal from Tyneside. The first police force was formed at the end of the 18th century to prevent theft and fraud in the Pool of London. Around this time the riverbanks began to fill with imposing warehouses, several of which survive, notably at Butler’s Wharf and Hay’s Wharf on the south shore of the Upper Pool. With the construction of inland docks such as West India and East India, and later Royal Victoria and Royal Albert, the largest ships found new berths but the Pool remained a hive of activity until the ineluctable decline of London as a port in the mid-20th century.
Hidden London

Wikipedia