Chinese Theatre Hall, Singapore


The Chinese Theatre Hall, Singapore,
c.1910

The Chinese Theatre Hall at Eu Tong Sen Street was known as the Heng Wai Sun Theatre Hall. After 1922, it was known as Sing Phing Theatre Hall.
National Archives of Singapore

Some web site put the theatre Near or next to the old Thong Chai Medical Institution, which is located here (Google Maps). National Library Board of Singapore has a photo captioned “This is a photograph of shoppers walking past the square bounded by People’s Park Complex (right) and the 10-storey OG Building (left) in Chinatown. OG Building housed the OG Department Store and was built on the site of Heng Wai Sun Theatre (1930s),” which seems to be about here. While both locations are in the same general area of Eu Tong See Street, they’re about 400 metres apart. Maybe one day someone who actually knows will came by and fix it.

From Wikipedia:
Eu Tong Sen Street is named after the tycoon, Eu Tong Sen who was a miner, rubber estate and a property owner. He was one of the richest men in Malaya and Singapore, and was born in Penang, Malaya in 1877. He set up a bank known as Lee Wah Bank which catered to the Cantonese, but was merged with the United Overseas Bank due to financial issues. The road was formerly part of the expunged Wayang Street, and it received its present name in 1919 as he rebuilt the street and acquired two Chinese opera theatres, known as Heng Seng Peng and Heng Wai Sun.

If that’s the road construction shown on the postcard, then it might c.1920, but that seems a bit late.

London Bridge, London


London Bridge after the 1904 widening. Copyright G. D & D. L.

c.1910
(According to MetroPostcards, Gottschalk, Dreyfuss & Davis Co., Ltd. (G. D & D. L.) were in operation 1909 to 1915.)

Bridge built 1831, widened 1902, removed 1968

Approximate location, Google Street View.
Tower on theright is St Magus the Martyr and the white building with columns just to the left of the bridge is Fishmongers’ Hall

Wikipedia
London Bridge Museum & Educational Trust (might have to increase zoom on brower to make page bigger)

Arab Quarter, Port Said


Port Said – Rue Arabe

Some post cards with this image are captioned “Native Coffee House” (presumably referring to the people seated on the left).

This is a street in the “Arab village”.  Al Abassi Mosque is on the left there, so this is approximately here on Google Maps. There is no street view but this view is close.

Port Said is at the Mediterranean end of the Suez Canal, that’s why it was developed. Early in the 20th century it became a major trading port and had a fast-growing population of people from all around the Mediterranean. The buildings were tall, with many balconies & verandahs, and commonly built of wood (see link below), which gives the city a fairly distinctive appearance. The European quarter was more substantial buildings and tree-lined streets. (Here.)

1914 map
1885 map shows the earlier division between the “Arabian Quarter” & rest of city
Port Said: Decaying Wooden Verandas Tell the Story of a City.


Port Said – Rue Arabe.

I’m not sure about the location of this one. Down the road a bit more and on the right (not visible in this image) is El-Tawfiqi Mosque, which seems to be here and there might be water in the background, so the street might be sort of around here.