Arab Quarter, Port Said


Port Said – Rue Arabe

This is a street in the “Arab village”.  Al Abassi Mosque is on the left there, so this is approximately here on Google Maps. There is no street view but this view is close.

Port Said is at the Mediterranean end of the Suez Canal, that’s why it was developed. Early in the 20th century it became a major trading port and had a fast-growing population of people from all around the Mediterranean. The buildings were tall, with many balconies & verandahs, and commonly built of wood (see link below), which gives the city a fairly distinctive appearance. The European quarter was more substantial buildings and tree-lined streets. (Here.)

1914 map
1885 map shows the earlier division between the “Arabian Quarter” & rest of city
Port Said: Decaying Wooden Verandas Tell the Story of a City.


Port Said – Rue Arabe.

I’m not sure about the location of this one. Down the road a bit more and on the right (not visible in this image) is El-Tawfiqi Mosque, which seems to be here and there might be water in the background, so the street might be sort of around here.

Brühl’s Terrace, Dresden


Treppe zur Brühl schen Terrasse

Steps to Bruhl’s Terrace. Google Street View

This is older postcard. It’s got the space for a message on the front and an undivided back, so before 1908, but I can do a bit better on the image at least.

First a brief history of the stairs (from WIkipedia because it gives the best summary I’ve so far come across).

After the Saxon defeat at the Battle of Leipzig and the occupation by Russian troops, military governor Prince Nikolai Grigorjevich Repnin-Wolkonski ordered the opening [of the terrace] to the public in 1814. He charged the architect Gottlob Friedrich Thormeyer with the building of a flight of stairs at the western end to reach the terrace from Castle Square and Augustus Bridge. The Brühl Palace was demolished in the course of the building of the Saxon Ständehaus in 1900.

The ensemble was totally destroyed in February 1945 when the city centre was heavily hit by the Allied Bombing of Dresden during the end phase of World War II. Today, it has been rebuilt; the precise amount restored is difficult to say as a percentage, but in general one can say the emsemble looks very much the same today as it did in the past.

Read moreBrühl’s Terrace, Dresden