Bullring & Rock La Linea, Spain & Gibraltar


Rock from Linea Bullring, Gibraltar
Published: Benzaquen & Co, Gibraltar

The bull ring in La Línea de la Concepción, a town in the province of Cádiz at the southern edge of Spain, close to the British territory of Gibraltar, was opened in 1883.

The bull ring is said to be unusual in that it has an odd number of sides. With 49 sides it is however nearly circular and it also has eleven entrances. The building was designed by Adolfo del Castillo and built on the Plaza de Arenal. It is now one of the oldest buildings in the town. The bull ring was built between 1880 and 1883 in a typical Andalusian style just thirteen years after the municipality was established. The bull ring is said to be a centre for meeting people including those from the nearby peninsula of Gibraltar. This may account for its original capacity being 6,000 people despite the town’s population only being 5,000 at the time.

Wikipedia.

Sugarloaf Mountain from Powerscourt Estate, Co. Wicklow, Ireland


Sugarloaf Mountain from Powerscourt, Co. Wicklow
Postmarked 1914
Publisher: E. Lynch, Bray

Google Street View

The beautiful Italian Garden truly offers the best in garden landscaping and design. The garden was designed to create a view that was part of the wider landscape and the result is a magnificent vista in every season. The exquisite series of terraces linking the house to the lake were constructed between 1843 and 1867 and were quite a feat to complete! Up to 100 labourers were employed in the work which took 12 years to complete. The design of the upper stone terrace nearest the house was influenced by Villa Butera in Sicily and the steep streets of Genoa and other Italian towns.
Powerscourt Estate

Yumuri Valley, Cuba


Yumuri Valley – Valle del Yumuri, Matanzas, Cuba
1900s
Pubishers: The Rotograph Company, New York (1904-1911)

The motorist who with more time at his disposal turns his face to the east will find that he has chosen a richly rewarding journey. He enters Matanzas through the famous Yumuri Valley generally regarded by Cubans as the loveliest spot on the island. It is roughly oval in form bounded on three sides by low hills and is watered by the Yumuri River which flows gently through it to the sea.
Bulletin of the Pan American Union (1931)

The Yumurí is a river in Cuba, which drains into Bahia de Matanzas, an arm of the Straits of Florida in the historic provincial capital of Matanzas. The river begins in the village of Imias and winds its way through 54.2 kilometres (33.7 mi), including a steep 220 metres (720 ft) canyon with walls 200 metres (660 ft) high. The Yumurí valley is claimed to be one of the island’s most scenic, noted for the biodiversity of its flora and fauna, as well as a variety of archaeological sites. The valley, actually drained by the Yumuri and Bacunayagua rivers, is surrounded by a 150 m high mountain ridge. These elevations provide many vantage points to view the valley. One important site is the Monserrat Hermitage, known for its view of Matanzas. According to local legend (in the Spanish Wikipedia entry), the valley’s and river’s name derives from the death cry (in Spanish) of a native princess.
Wikipedia

Bruges, Belgium


On back:
Bruges: Panorama pris d’une fenêtre de la Tour du Beffroi
(Panorama taken from a window of the Belfry)
c.1920
Publisher: Nels (Ernest Thill)

Google Street View (approximately)

The 83-metre high Belfort (belfry) from the 13th century is one of the three iconic towers of Bruges, together with the towers of Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk (Church of Our Lady), and Sint-Salvatorskathedraal (St Saviour’s Cathedral). Those who climb the 366 stairs are rewarded with an impressive view of Bruges and surrounds.
Musea Brugge

Belfry
The Belfry of Bruges is a medieval bell tower in the centre of Bruges, Belgium. One of the city’s most prominent symbols, the belfry formerly housed a treasury and the municipal archives, and served as an observation post for spotting fires and other danger. A narrow, steep staircase of 366 steps, accessible by the public for an entry fee, leads to the top of the 83 m (272 feet) high building, which leans 87 centimeters to the east. . . . The belfry was added to the market square around 1240, when Bruges was an important centre of the Flemish cloth industry. After a devastating fire in 1280, the tower was largely rebuilt.
Wikipedia.

St Saviour’s Cathedral
The Saint-Salvator Cathedral, the main church of the city, is one of the few buildings in Bruges that have survived the onslaught of the ages without damage. Nevertheless, it has undergone some changes and renovations. This church was not originally built to be a cathedral; it was granted the status in the 19th century. . . . The roof of the cathedral collapsed in a fire in 1839. Robert Chantrell, an English architect, famous for his neo-Gothic restorations of English churches, was asked to restore to Sint-Salvator its former glory. At the same time he was authorized to make a project for a higher tower, in order to make it taller than that of the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk [Church of Our Lady]. The oldest surviving part, dated from the 12th century, formed the base of the mighty tower. Instead of adding a neo-Gothic part to the tower, Chantrell chose a very personal Romanesque design. After completion there was a lot of criticism and the royal commission for monuments (Koninklijke Commissie voor Monumenten), without authorization by Chantrell, had placed a small peak on top of the tower, because the original design was deemed too flat. The Neo-Romanesque west tower is fortress-like 99 meters high.
Wikipedia.

Heath Common, Heath, West Yorkshire, England


Heath Common, near Wakefield
Published: Valentine
Postmarked: 1908

Street View

Located 1.5 miles east of Wakefield the village of Heath lies within the registered Common, a large grassland with areas of scrub, and is a conservation area of historic and architectural importance.

The Common has been open land for hundreds of years, with enclosure fought against by people including the local naturalist Charles Waterton. It gained registered common status in the late 19th century. Five major houses now stand within the village including the Grade 1 listed Heath Hall. Some of the houses date from the 17th century.

Wakefield Council