Bridge of Don, Aberdeen


New Bridge of Don, Aberdeen
Postmarked & dated 1917
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View (approximate).

The Bridge of Don is a five-arch bridge of granite crossing the River Don just above its mouth in Aberdeen, Scotland. In 1605 Alexander Hay executed a Charter of Mortification for the maintenance of the 13th century Brig o’ Balgownie further upstream, which later became the Bridge of Don Fund, which financed several bridges in the north-east of Scotland. This fund having accumulated a value of over GB£20,000, the patrons of the fund, the town council, sought an Act of Parliament to permit construction of a new bridge in 1825. The original design by John Gibb and John Smith was modified by Thomas Telford, and construction work started in 1827.[4] Problems with the foundations meant it had to be partly taken down and have additional piles sunk. It was opened free to the public with no toll in 1830 and later gave its name to the suburb of the city on the north bank.
Wikipedia.

Venetian Bridge, Clacton-on-Sea, England


The Bridge, Clacton-on-Sea
c.1930

Google Street View.

Clacton-on-Sea is the largest town in the Tendring peninsula and district in Essex, eastern England, and was founded as an urban district in 1871. . . . In 1871 the Essex railway engineer and land developer Peter Bruff, the steamboat owner William Jackson, and a group of businessmen built a pier and the Royal Hotel (now converted to flats) on a stretch of farmland adjoining low gravelly cliffs and a firm sand-and-shingle beach near the villages of Great and Little Clacton. The town of Clacton-on-Sea was officially incorporated in 1872 and laid out rather haphazardly over the next few years: though it has a central ‘grand’ avenue (originally Electric Parade, now Pier Avenue) the street plan incorporates many previously rural lanes and tracks, such as Wash Lane. Plots and streets were sold off piecemeal to developers and speculators. In 1882 the Great Eastern Railway already serving the well-established resort of Walton-on-the-Naze along the coast, built a spur to Clacton-on-Sea with a junction at Thorpe-le-Soken. Clacton grew into the largest seaside resort between Southend-on-Sea and Great Yarmouth, with some 10,000 residents by 1914 and approx. 20,000 by 1939.
Wikipedia.20

The bridge crosses Pier Gap that leads down to the pier from the town. It was built in 1914 to provide pedestrian access from the seaside attractions on the cliff on one side of the gap to the other.
Geograph

Clapper Bridge, Postbridge, England


Celtic Bridge at Post Bridge, Dartmoor
c.1910
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View.

Clapper bridge over East Dart river. Probably C13 although it may have had more recent repairs. Roughly shaped blocks of granite to the piers with 3 rough granite lintels. 3-span bridge. This bridge is one of the medieval routes across the moor from Exeter to Tavistock.
Historic England.

The first written record of a clapper bridge here dates from 1655, but the bridge was definitely built sometime in the medieval period, possibly the 12th century. It is composed of three large granite piers supporting four massive slabs, with a total span of over 42 feet.The slabs were probably brought from Bellever, 1.5 miles away, or possibly from Lower White Tor, 2 miles distant. Either way, it was a serious undertaking to quarry, then transport the huge slabs. The bridge crosses the East Dart, a tributary of the River Dart, and was built so that packhorses could carry tin to Tavistock.

Immediately beside the clapper bridge is a second bridge, built in the 1780s to replace the medieval bridge and take traffic between Moretonhampstead and Tavistock.

Britain Express

Bridge, Bude, England


Bude, Old Bridge
c.1910
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

Google Street View.

Alongside the sea and by the canal runs the river Neet (or Strat). The two halves of the town are connected by a small grade two listed building, a bridge called Nanny Moore’s, named after a 19th century ‘dipper’ who lived nearby. Beyond this lay the quay, rebuilt in 1577 with funds from the Blanchminster charity. The river divided the land owned by two Cornish families. South of the river was owned by Sir John Arundell, while land to the north was owned by Sir Richard Grenville of Stowe Barton, Kilkhampton. During the 1700-1800s, Bude was a thriving port used by smaller vessels. Over time, the land changed hands – the Grenville land passed to the Carterets/Thynnes while the Arundell land passed to the Aclands. Bude and neighbouring Stratton are relevant in the English Civil War, with Nanny Moore’s Bridge featuring as a passe over the river for the Royalists.
Wikipedia.

The three span bridge is a Grade II listed building and originally had a cantilevered section so that boats could proceed along the River Neet. Today it is only used by pedestrian but was built when carts and packhorses would trundle across. Until the nineteenth century it was simply known as Bude Bridge. So why the change to Nanny Moore’s bridge? Not sure exactly why the name was altered but it seems it was named after a ‘dipper’ who lived nearby. A dipper would escort and help ladies, who wanted to swim in the nearby sea. She would be a strong person, sometimes in charge of a bathing machine. This was to protect the modesty of 19th century ladies – no bikinis and the like back then!
Mike’s Cornwall

Double Bridge, Tokyo Imperial Palace, Tokyo


Handwritten on back:
Empire palace & “Nijyubashi”, Double bridge

Google Street View

Edo Castle also had two bridges here, but the names were different. The stone bridge was a wooden bridge called 西之丸大手橋 nishi no maru ōtebashi “front bridge to the western compound” and the iron bridge was also a wooden bridge called 西之丸下乗橋 nishi no maru kejōbashi “dismount bridge to the western compound.” Nijubashi was actually the nickname of the kejōbashi (now the iron bridge), not the ōtebashi (now the stone bridge). The bridge was built in 1614 by the shōgun, Tokugawa Hidetada. The bridge had a secondary wooden support mechanism built underneath which made it a 2 level construction. Because of these two levels, it looked like there were two bridges. The nickname 二重橋 nijūbashi/futaebashi came to be used as it was quite a distinctive bridge.

When the imperial court moved into the castle in 1868 but the bridges remained. After the confiscation and destruction of the daimyō residences in Daimyō Alley and elsewhere, the old bridge and gate system was re-evaluated. The two bridges were chosen as the main entrances to Tokyo Castle (the Imperial Palace). The kejōbashi was torn down and replaced with an iron bridge in 1888. It was rebuilt again in 1964 to match the 新宮殿 Shin Kyūden the New Palace, which is the collection of shitty 60’s-looking buildings that litter the palace grounds.
Nijubashi – Tokyo’s Most Famous Bridge

City Bridge, Winchester, England


The City Bridge, Winchester
c.1910
“Wykeham Series”

Google Street View (location).

The City Bridge at the junction of High Street and Bridge Street is well- preserved and is largely unaltered since its construction in the early 19th century. Situated at the main crossing place of medieval Winchester, the monument preserves archaeological deposits of significance, such as the remains of a medieval bridge.
Historic England

Trent Bridge & Midlands Industrial Exhibition, Nottingham, England


Trent Bridge, Nottingham
c.1904
Publisher: “S & Co, Nottm”

Midlands Industrial Exhibition in background.

Google Street View.

Constructed in an eye-catching Mughal (Indian) style, the steel-framed main building had two floors and was named the ‘Ivory Palace’. Its construction was swift with two different contractors working from either end, although reputedly there was a problem when they met in the middle as the alignment was discovered to be a few inches awry. The grounds housed a Japanese tea house, Canadian water chute (nearly 100 feet high and with a 600 foot slope), an American roller coaster, ‘Tom Thumb’ miniature railway, ‘Hampton Court maze’, and a ‘Fairy River’ that took visitors through caverns past walls set with magical scenes and down ‘a lane of stalactites a mile long’.

Unfortunately, the ‘greatest thing’ lasted a mere 14 months as on the night of 4 July 1904 an electrical fault in one of the Fairy River caverns caused a fire and while all the visitors were successfully evacuated, the conflagration spread rapidly across the site with flames leaping hundreds of feet into the air and threatening houses in nearby streets.
Picture Nottingham


The Exhibition, Nottingham
c.1904
Publisher: Stewart & Woolf

On the back, in the message section, this card has this typed:

Dear Auntie,
Nottingham is noted for many things and amongst others as being the birth-places and home of the Fountain Head Tea, packed by Smith Fowler & Co. They sold tea to Grandma 80 years ago and are selling it to us today. We cannot get any other so reliable.
Your affectionately, DOLLY


Trent Bridges, Nottingham
c.1910

Town Arms (now Brewhouse & Kitchen) on the left.

Google Street View

Trent Bridge is an iron and stone road bridge across the River Trent in Nottingham, England. It is the principal river crossing for entrance to the city from the south, although the upstream Clifton Bridge is both larger and busier. . . . The bridge was designed by Marriott Ogle Tarbotton. Construction started in 1868 and was completed in 1871 by Derbyshire iron maker, Andrew Handyside. The general contractor was Benton and Woodiwiss of Derby. It was completed for a cost of £30,000 (equivalent to £2,813,922 as of 2019). There were three main cast iron arch spans each 100 feet (30 m) braced by wrought iron girders. The width between the parapets was 40 feet (12 m). It is a Grade II listed building. The carving on the bridge was executed by Mawer and Ingle of Leeds. The new Trent Bridge formed part of a series of works along the banks of the river to improve flood defences by the construction of stepped, stone embankments.
Wikipedia.


Trent Bridge, Nottingham
Postmarked 1950
Publisher: Valentine & Sons

Fitzgerald Bridge, Pune, India


The Bund Bridge. Poona

Google Maps

The Fitzgerald Bridge (also known as the Bund Garden Bridge) is an historic structure located in Pune, India. It was constructed in 1867 during the British India period. It was the first spandrel arch bridge in the city of Pune, connecting the Bund Garden to the Chima garden. The bridge crosses the Mula-Mutha River. It features a representation of a Medici lion at each end of the bridge. The bridge was designed and constructed by Captain Robert S. Sellon of the Royal Engineers. It was built for the sum of ₹ 2 lakh. The Bridge is named for the Governor of Bombay at the time, Sir William Robert Vesey Fitzgerald.
Wikipedia