Five Rise Locks, Bingley, England


Five Rise Locks
Postmarked: 1907

Google Street View

YouTube: The Story of The Bingley Five Rise Locks – Viewed from Narrowboat and Drone

Bingley Five-rise lock staircase is the most spectacular feature of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. It is situated about half a mile north of Bingley Station, about 17 miles north west of Leeds and about 12 miles south east of Skipton. A lock staircase is where the locks open directly from one to another, with the top gate of one forming the bottom gate of the next. This unique 5-rise staircase has a total rise of 60 feet.
Pennine Waterways (also a lot of photos)

The five-rise opened on 21 March 1774 and was a major feat of engineering at the time. When the locks and therefore the canal from Gargrave to Thackley was opened in 1774, a crowd of 30,000 people turned out to celebrate. The first boat to use the locks took just 28 minutes.
Wikipedia


Bingley Five Rise Locks
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

Suez Canal, Egypt


CANAL DE SUEZ. – Ship crossing the Canal.

Publisher: Levy & Neurdein Reunis (1920-1932). image might be earlier.


Canal de SUEZ. – Steamer in lake Timsah – Navire dans le Lac Timsah

Publisher: Levy & Neurdein Reunis (1920-1932). Image might be earlier.

Lake Timsah (Wikipedia_


SUEZ CANAL. – Steamer crossing the Trench of Toussoun

Publisher: Levy Sons & Co. (1895-1919)

Toussoun on 1912 map (right of Lake Timsah)

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Bridge, Bude, England


Bude, Old Bridge
c.1910
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

Google Street View.

Alongside the sea and by the canal runs the river Neet (or Strat). The two halves of the town are connected by a small grade two listed building, a bridge called Nanny Moore’s, named after a 19th century ‘dipper’ who lived nearby. Beyond this lay the quay, rebuilt in 1577 with funds from the Blanchminster charity. The river divided the land owned by two Cornish families. South of the river was owned by Sir John Arundell, while land to the north was owned by Sir Richard Grenville of Stowe Barton, Kilkhampton. During the 1700-1800s, Bude was a thriving port used by smaller vessels. Over time, the land changed hands – the Grenville land passed to the Carterets/Thynnes while the Arundell land passed to the Aclands. Bude and neighbouring Stratton are relevant in the English Civil War, with Nanny Moore’s Bridge featuring as a passe over the river for the Royalists.
Wikipedia.

The three span bridge is a Grade II listed building and originally had a cantilevered section so that boats could proceed along the River Neet. Today it is only used by pedestrian but was built when carts and packhorses would trundle across. Until the nineteenth century it was simply known as Bude Bridge. So why the change to Nanny Moore’s bridge? Not sure exactly why the name was altered but it seems it was named after a ‘dipper’ who lived nearby. A dipper would escort and help ladies, who wanted to swim in the nearby sea. She would be a strong person, sometimes in charge of a bathing machine. This was to protect the modesty of 19th century ladies – no bikinis and the like back then!
Mike’s Cornwall

Double Bridge, Tokyo Imperial Palace, Tokyo


Handwritten on back:
Empire palace & “Nijyubashi”, Double bridge

Google Street View

Edo Castle also had two bridges here, but the names were different. The stone bridge was a wooden bridge called 西之丸大手橋 nishi no maru ōtebashi “front bridge to the western compound” and the iron bridge was also a wooden bridge called 西之丸下乗橋 nishi no maru kejōbashi “dismount bridge to the western compound.” Nijubashi was actually the nickname of the kejōbashi (now the iron bridge), not the ōtebashi (now the stone bridge). The bridge was built in 1614 by the shōgun, Tokugawa Hidetada. The bridge had a secondary wooden support mechanism built underneath which made it a 2 level construction. Because of these two levels, it looked like there were two bridges. The nickname 二重橋 nijūbashi/futaebashi came to be used as it was quite a distinctive bridge.

When the imperial court moved into the castle in 1868 but the bridges remained. After the confiscation and destruction of the daimyō residences in Daimyō Alley and elsewhere, the old bridge and gate system was re-evaluated. The two bridges were chosen as the main entrances to Tokyo Castle (the Imperial Palace). The kejōbashi was torn down and replaced with an iron bridge in 1888. It was rebuilt again in 1964 to match the 新宮殿 Shin Kyūden the New Palace, which is the collection of shitty 60’s-looking buildings that litter the palace grounds.
Nijubashi – Tokyo’s Most Famous Bridge

Fitzgerald Bridge, Pune, India


The Bund Bridge. Poona

Google Maps

The Fitzgerald Bridge (also known as the Bund Garden Bridge) is an historic structure located in Pune, India. It was constructed in 1867 during the British India period. It was the first spandrel arch bridge in the city of Pune, connecting the Bund Garden to the Chima garden. The bridge crosses the Mula-Mutha River. It features a representation of a Medici lion at each end of the bridge. The bridge was designed and constructed by Captain Robert S. Sellon of the Royal Engineers. It was built for the sum of ₹ 2 lakh. The Bridge is named for the Governor of Bombay at the time, Sir William Robert Vesey Fitzgerald.
Wikipedia

La Coupée, Sark


5660. SARK LA COUPÉE.
The Cut, Sark

Published Photochrom Co., London and Tunbridge Wells. POstmarked 1912

Street View

La Coupée, the causeway which joins big and little Sark, is about 100m long. It is a high ridge 80 metres (262 ft) above the sea which is only some three metres in width. This is gradually being eroded and Little Sark will eventually become an island (a similar process is likely to have occurred with Brecqhou close to Sark’s west coast).

Several small islets lie close to the shore of Little Sark. These include Moie de la Fontaine and Moie de la Bretagne on the west coast, Petite Baveuse, Moie du Port Gorey Seceuil and Bretagne Uset along the south coast, and Brenière on the east coast. Several tiny islets also lie in Baleine Bay, which stretches along much of the east coast of Little Sark and also the southeast coast of great Sark, and L’Etac de Sark and les Demies lie to the southeast of Little Sark.

Until the beginning of the twentieth century, access to Little Sark was extremely difficult or, at best, unnerving. La Coupée was traversed by a narrow dirt track, and children are reputed to have had to crawl across it on their hands and knees to prevent being blown over the edge by the wind. According to a description in 1875, “People have thrown themselves flat on their face, from terror and nervousness on reaching the Coupée; others have lost courage half way across, and have hidden themselves behind the heads of the rocks that crop up in the middle of the Coupée until some passer by came and led them along; others have been unable to get across without shutting their eyes and being led between two persons.” On 4 September 1802, Elie Guille of the Clos-à-Jaon was carrying sheaves of corn across La Coupée for the payment of tithes. He was blown over the East side and killed.
Isle of Sark