Union Station, Indianapolis, Indiana


“Union Station”, Indianapolis, Ind.
c.1910

In 1847, the Madison & Indianapolis Railroad reached Indianapolis. Railroads connected the young state capital to the rest of the nation. Over the next decade, other major rail lines would reach town. Because the railroads crossed through at various locations, connections for freight and travelers were complicated. In August 1849, Union Railway Company formed to solve the problem. The company laid tracks to connect the railroads, then built a large brick train shed where all lines met – America’s first Union Station, which was located on this site. As the city’s rail-based trade grew, rail, business, and civic leaders wanted a new station befitting the importance of railroads to Indianapolis. In 1886, the railroads hired Pittsburgh architect Thomas Rodd to plan a new “head house,” or main office/waiting hall.
National Park Service

Wikipedia

Union Station, Washington, D.C.


Union Station Waiting Room, Washington, D.C.
Published: The Washington New Company, Washington. D.C.
c.1920

On back:
UNION STATION WAITING ROOM, Washington. The new Union Station was built by the U.S. Government and the Pennsylvania Railroad and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The cost of the land, building and terminal improvements was $18,000,000. The structure is the finest railway station in the world. The building of white granite, is 760 feet in length and 343 feet in width.

Union station smaller
“Train Concourse, Union Station, Washington, D.C.” c.1910 (postmarked 1912)

Text on back:
The Train Concourse of the Union Railway Station at Washington, D.C. is 760 feed in length. There is standing room for 50,000 people within its vast area. At one end is an entrance to the private waiting room for the President of the U.S. and the ambassadors of foreign countries.

 

 

 

History of Union Station

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