Hotel Lamartine, Amiens, France


1920-1940

No caption or other information. Probably a photo turned into a postcard.

Google Street View.

Over the door it says “G. Edwards/Late Australian Forces”.

A SOUTH AUSSIE’S WEDDING IN AMIENS CATHEDRAL.
A correspondent wrote to The Register from Amiens, in France, on April 12:— “In the thousands of homes in Australia represented by gallant sons the name of the city of Amiens is a household and historic memory, as well as the famous and noble cathedral which adorns it. The sons of Australia in the main were responsible for preventing the city from failing into the hands of the Germans, and thus they conserved for France and the Somme area a treasure of art and sentiment dear to the French nation. Following upon the Australians’ attack of August 8–just a week later–a memorable thanksgiving service was held in the holy edifice. This service was conducted from an improvised altar, which was draped with the Australian flag, at a later date dedicated and hung in the chancel.

This morning one of the most historic ceremonies ever performed in the cathedral took place, when Madamoselle Ernestine Sueur, of the Hotel Lamartine, Amiens, was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to Dvr. George Edwards, A.I.F., son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Edwards, Stanley Hotel. Clare, South Australia. By order of the holy dignataries of the cathedral the flag of Australia was temporarily removed from the chancel to the altar, at which the ceremony was performed, as a tribute to the Australian soldier, and the memory of Australia’s many gallant deeds. There were a large number of guests present, and the crowds of visitors thronged the cathedral to witness the memorable event, for Dvr. Edwards was the first British soldier to be married within the confines of the aged, sacred, and stately Gothic pile. Among the guests present were Mr. Russell Rayson, of Melbourne, and Capt. G. Bassett, base cashier for the British armies in France. Capt. Bassett, speaking at the sumptuous wedding breakfast, declared that it was the proudest moment of his life to be present at a digger’s wedding
The Register (Adelaide), 20 May 1920

Read moreHotel Lamartine, Amiens, France

Cattle Market, Norwich, England


Castle and Cattle Market, Norwich
c.1910
Publisher: Jarrold & Sons

Google Street View (approximate)

A row of shops stood on the road that led up from the market place to the castle gates. These shops sold farm supplies, and after the cattle market closed they were occupied by a pet shop and a travel agent. The livestock markets were moved from various other streets in the city to the ‘Castle Ditches’ in 1738; before then pigs for example had been sold at ‘Hog Hill’ (now Timber Hill) and horses in Tombland.
joemasonspage

…the livestock market south of St Peter Mancroft was becoming overwhelmingly crowded on market days. Eventually part of the eastern side of the castle mound was levelled, and in 1738 the livestock sales were moved to this new site. The old hay market remained on the old site for more than a century, until it was also moved to the new livestock market site in the early 19th century. The new livestock market was one of the last significant livestock markets in a British city centre, and developed a reputation as “the cruellest in the country
Wikipedia.

Nagoya Hotel, Nagoya, Japan


The Nagoya Hotel, Nagoya, Japan
1900s

Old Tokyo: Nagoya Hotel, Nagoya, c. 1900.

When we arrived at Nagoya we were met and escorted to the Nagoya Hotel by a number of mounted police. This hotel is one of the worst I have ever seen. No attention was paid to us, the place was inconceivably dirty, and the meals were almost impossible. . . . There is only the one hotel in Nagoya, and although I have given a bad report of it, any one going there will have to stop there. I presume that is why the proprietor is so independent.
“A Woman’s World Tour in a Motor”, Harriet White Fisher, 1911, p.268-9

Nagoya Hotel (名古屋ホテル) in Nagoya City, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. The hotel, for many years the only accommodation for foreign visitors in the city, was opened in 1895 (Meiji 28) and located at 80 Katamitsukura-machi (竪三蔵町80). In 1907 (Meiji 40) it ceased business operations, but in 1919 (Taisho 8) it was bought by the Osaka Hotel. The hotel was burned down during WWII.
Meijishowa

Dhobi Ghats, Mumbai


Dhobee Ghats, Bombay
c.1910

Google Maps.

Dhobi Ghat is an open air laundromat (lavoir) in Mumbai, India. The washers, known as dhobis, work in the open to clean clothes and linens from Mumbai’s hotels and hospitals. It was constructed in 1890.
Wikipedia.

At first, Dhobi Ghat presents a chaotic scene. However, a closer look brings out the order in the chaos. Lines and lines of washed clothes are hung out to dry in a manner that optimizes both time and space. This is a labor-intensive process, and the washermen, also called dhobis, have a system in place that takes care of washing, sorting, and ironing.
Behind the Scenes at Mumbai’s 140-Year-Old Dhobi Ghat

“I use a dhobi,” explained our guide Freni Avari. “His father used to work for my mother. We are continuing. It’s like family.”

She described how the dhobi system works. “He comes to the house once a week. Every household has a dhobi bag or container where all the clothes are kept. He doesn’t write down what he takes. He just knows,” said Freni. “He wraps them up in a bundle and takes them.”
Dhobi Ghats, the Outdoor Laundries of Mumbai

Sugar Maples Hotel, Maplecrest, New York


Writing Room at Sugar Maples, Maplecrest, N.Y.
Postmarked: 1948
Publisher: Art Vue Postcard Co, New York

Google Maps.

Sugar Maples Resort – Maplecrest, NY 1970’s (video)

Layout, 1960s

Hotel started in 1925 by Sherwood “Gus” Moseman, who had owned a very successful mercantile business on Staten Island before serving in World War I. After the war, he returned to the family store in Big Hollow. As the years went by, more and more of his friends from New York visited, many staying for a week or two. Seeing a business opportunity, he sold the family store and opened a hotel. Several years earlier Big Hollow had changed its name to Maplecrest, so the new hotel was called the Sugar Maples.

Like most of the successful twentieth century Catskill Mountains hotels, the emphasis was on food and activities. The 700 seat dining room became widely known for quality dining. Guests were kept busy with guided hikes, horseback riding, bicycling, tennis courts, a baseball field with roofed bleachers, a huge heated outdoor swimming pool, a roller skating rink, a library and an orchestra for evening dances
Catskill Archive