Colwyn Bay, Wales


Colwyn Bay looking west
c.1910

Street View

The Victoria Pier and Pavilion were opened in 1900 and could accommodate 2,500 people. The pier was initially 12 metres wide and 96 metres long, but was later extended to 320 metres.
Colwyn Bay Heritage Online

Work began in 1899 to the design of Maynall and Littlewood of Manchester. The pier opened on 1st June 1900 to a length of 220 feet, including a 2500 seat pavilion. The Bijou Theatre, built in 1916, accommodated 600. In 1922, the main pavilion was burnt down. It was replaced the following year, by the pier’s new owners, the local council. In 1933, the pavilion was once again destroyed by fire and, two months later, a separate blaze wrecked the Bijou Theatre. A replacement pavilion opened in 1934.
National Piers Society

Designed by Maynall & Littlewoods of Manchester, Colwyn Bay’s Victoria Pier was one of the later British piers to be built, with construction starting in June 1899 by the Salford firm of William Brown & Sons. Many of the pier’s components were pre-fabricated, and manufactured by the Widnes Iron Foundry. Its official opening was on 1 June 1900, when the architect, Mr. Littlewood, handed a golden key to the pier’s owners. As first constructed, the pier was just 316 ft (96m) long and 40 ft (12m) wide, comprising a timber promenade deck with seating and railings along its length, and a 2,500 seat pavilion in the Moorish Revival style. The pavilion was set to the right of the deck, with a walkway allowing access to the pier-head to the left. The pavilion’s main entrance was flanked on one side by a flower shop and, on the other, by a coffee lounge and cake shop. Inside, the pavilion boasted a large balcony which extended around three sides of the auditorium and a full orchestra pit. In 1903, the Victoria Pier Company decided to extend the neck to a length of 750 ft (227m) to facilitate outdoor theatrical performances. The pier featured intricate cast iron balustrades, manufactured by the Widnes Iron Foundry, and similar balustrade designs can be found at Mumbles Pier, and formerly at Grand Pier, Weston-super-Mare and Morecambe’s Central and West End Piers.
Wikipedia.


Victoria Pavilion, Colwyn Bay
Postmarked 1903
Publisher: J. Homan, Colywn Bay/Valentine

Roman baths, Bath, Somerset, England, UK


Bath. Roman Baths & Abbey

Caption on back:
Bath: Roman Baths and Abbey
Within a distance of a few yards are the Roman Baths, built about A.D. 55; the Abbey, erected in 1499; the King’s Bath of 17th and 18th century constructions, and the modern Bathing establishment containing the latest scientific appliances for the administration of the radioactive waters for the cure and relief of many complaints.

Official Website has a Walkthrough (photos) and a3D Model (3D walkthrough) under Discover


Roman bath before restoration, Bath

The Roman Baths, Bath
The hot springs of Bath are of great antiquity, and baths are said to have been erected as early as BC 860. Tradition tells that St. David and King Arthur visited the springs early in the sixth century, when the springs received the blessing of the church.

Not sure when the “restoration” was. Might be 1890s redevelopment/reopening of the site. The carved statues date from then (1894).


Circular Bath, Bath

Riverton Casino, Portland


Red Room Riverton Casino
Greetings from Portland, Maine

1904-1907

The writing on the card is the message written by the sender. Early postcards only allowed the address to be written on the back. This changed in the US in 1907. The publisher of the card (Hugh G. Leighton) was apparently only in operation from 1904 to 1909 (reference).

External view & history.

Street View–approximate location

Rotten Row, Hyde Park, London


London – Rotton Row

Caption on back:
ROTTEN ROW, HYDE PARK
Is the fashionable Equestrian Promenade of London. It is 1 1/2 miles long, is approached from Hyde Park Corner, S.E. and extends along the side of the Serpentine.

Published: London Stereoscopic Company

Above View–Rotten Row is the sandy track

Street View from South Carriage Drive

Wikipedia


Rotten Row, London


Rotten Row, Hyde Park, London

Tower of London, London


The Tower of London
1900s
Publisher: H. Vertigen & Co (1906-9)


I’ve marked the locations of the cards below on this map. (Click for larger version.) The base map comes from Hipkiss’s Scanned Old Maps

Postcards of Tower and river

Historic Royal Places: Tower of London (aimed at visitors)

UNESCO World Heritage Listing

Authorised Guide to the Tower of London, 1904 (on Project Gutenberg)

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, which is separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins), although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under kings Richard I, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.
Wikipedia

The Tower of London was founded by King William the Conqueror. After his coronation on Christmas Day, 1066, William hastily ordered the erection of a wooden fortress between the Thames and the ancient Roman wall which then surrounded London. William began the building of what is now termed as the White Tower ten years later. A rectangular stone keep of Caen stone, designed as an impregnable fortress and as an impressive and awesome demonstration of his power to the Londoners. With ramparts which were fifteen feet thick at the base and walls soaring ninety feet high, the dominating shadow of the Tower loomed forebodingly over the huddled wooden buildings of medieval London, a visible expression of Norman power.
English Monarchs: The Tower of London in the Middle Ages


On the back:
TOWER OF LONDON
The Middle tower
The Middle Tower forms the principal entrance to the Tower of London, and protects the bridge across the most. It is the only Tower outside the moat.</em?

MT on map
Google Street View.

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