Madeira Walk, Brighton, England


Madeira Walk, Kempton, Brighton
c.1915
Publisher: Alfred William Wardell, Brighton
Google Street View (approximate)

Madeira Terrace was originally built as a covered promenade to attract tourists from London when the new railway opened in the late 1800s. It was built by borough surveyor Philip Lockwood and opened to the east of Royal Crescent in 1890, before being extended to meet the Aquarium in 1927 to 1929. It is considered the longest cast iron structure in Britain, running from the Aquarium Colonnade to the Volk’s railway maintenance building.
Brighton & Hove City Council: Madeira Terrace restoration

The Madeira Drive runs from the Aquarium to King’s Cliff, Kemp Town. The sea-wall is a fine work, about 25 feet thick at the base and 3 feet at the summit. The creepers and shrubs by which the wall is partially screened do much to relieve what would oherwise be a rather dreary prospect. An Arcade, about half a mile long, running eastward from a point near the aquarium, with an asphalted terrace walk on the top, and provided with seats, affords cover in wet weather; and near the eastern extremity is a large Shelter Hall and Reading-Room, similar to that on the beach at the foot of West Street. Refreshments can be obtained in the Shelter Hall, and time-tables, etc., consulted. A Lift communicates with the Marine Parade above. Here, too, is a Bandstand. The slopes at the eastern end of the Madeira Drive, known as the Duke’s Mound, are planted with shrubs, and the carriage drive extends as far as Black Rock.
Brighton Toy Museum (has more pictures)

Madeira Terrace, Madeira Walk, lift tower and related buildings (Madeira Terrace) were built between 1890 and 1897 to the design of the Brighton Borough Engineer, Philip Lockwood (1821-1908). They were constructed by Messrs J Longley and Co of Crawley, at a combined cost of £13,795 Earlier, between 1830 and 1833, the natural East Cliff at Brighton was made good by the application of a concrete covering, and was then planted up to achieve a green wall which is now believed to be the oldest and largest of its kind in Europe, with over 100 species of flowering plants recorded. The concept of attaching a cast-iron terrace to the cliff was inspired by the innovative construction, expressed at the Great Exhibition, Crystal Palace of 1851. The idea was promoted by one of the great iron foundries of the Victorian period, Macfarlane and Co of Glasgow as early as 1874, but was rejected as being unworkable. By 1880, public funding had been arranged and the concept became a technical reality. Madeira Terrace was built under the terms of the Brighton Improvement Act of 1884 and was open to the east of the Royal Crescent by 1890, but controversy prevented its completion to the west.
Historic England

Mitchell Park Zoo, Durban, South Africa


Mitchell Park Zoo, Durban
c.1910
Publisher: A. Rittenburg, Durban

Named after Sir Charles Bullen Hugh Mitchell, the park was established in the early half of the century as an ostrich farm. That venture did not go as well as planned, so it was transformed into a zoo instead. Back then, a large variety of animals, including lions, leopards, crocodiles and many varieties of bird, occupied a large part of the zoo. The remainder consisted of beautifully landscaped gardens.
Mitchell Park Zoo

Pierrots, Scarborough, England


The Pierrots, Scarborough.
1900s
Publisher: Gottschalk, Dreyfuss & Davis Co, London

Google Street View.

Pierrot troupes, alongside Punch & Judy and pantomime are one of the very few, indigenous, British performance forms – they are an important part of our cultural heritage and folk traditions. The origins of the pierrot character come from the medieval Italian Comedy or Commedia d’ell Arte, as do those of Harlequin & Columbine, whom we associate with pantomime and Mr Punch of Punch & Judy fame. What is unique about pierrot in Britain, is that there evolved troupes of pierrots specifically at the seaside: the story begins with the development of the seaside resorts and the mass market of holidaymakers as the industrial revolution took hold.
Seaside Follies

[The] story begins with theatrical entrepeneur Will Catlin (real name William Fox) whose popular pierrots were a regular sight on Scarborough’s South Bay during the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth. Often referred to as the ‘sad clown’ the pierrot character has a long history – dating back to the seventeenth century, but became popular during the nineteenth century in France and beyond, as a recurring motif in theatre. With a whitened face and baggy attire, the pierrot was a naive, innocent character, whose antics included comedy, mime, song and dance.

Catlin, a former music hall performer first visited Scarborough in 1894, and it was during that time that he formed his renowed group of exclusively all-male pierrots. Whilst his pierrots toured widely – even over the winter months, when they visited a variety of cities and towns – in Scarborough they performed (during the early days) on a makeshift stage on the South Bay. They were not the only pierrot group in town – George Royle’s ‘Imps’ performed a similar act on the South Sands from the early 1900s, but adopted different tactics after being invited to entertain audiences at Floral Hall in Alexandra Gardens. Unlike Catlin’s group, Royle’s performers were male and female, and in their new venue wore period costumes, calling themselves the Fol-de-Rols.
Stories from Scarborough

The Grand Hotel is a large hotel in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, England, overlooking the town’s South Bay. It is a Grade II listed building that is owned by Britannia Hotels. At the time of its grand opening in 1867, it was the largest hotel and the largest brick structure in Europe.
Wikipedia.

Arboretum, Nottingham, England


Arboretum, Nottingham
Publisher: Stewart & Woolf, London

This might be the aviary, opposite the lake.

The park was designed as a botanical collection, in the “natural order”, and as a tranquil place in which to relax, forming a major attraction in the heart of Victorian Nottingham. From 1852 it was open free of charge on Sunday, Monday and Wednesday, but was 6d admission (equivalent to £2.74 in 2019)[5] on other days, or £1 (equivalent to £109.46 in 2019)[5] for a yearly permit.
Wikipedia.

The Enclosure Act of 1845 enclosed fields and meadows used by the burgesses or freeholders of the City of Nottingham to graze their animals. To compensate for the loss of the open space used for recreation, the Act allotted space for a series of places of public recreation and public walks. Some 130 acres (c 54ha) made up of Queen’s Walk and Queen’s Walk Park (Meadow Cricket Ground), Victoria Park, Robin Hood Chase, Corporation Oaks, St Ann’s Hill Avenue, Nottingham Arboretum, the General Cemetery, Waterloo Promenade, the Church Cemetery, and the Forest were created as public open spaces from the enclosures. Under the Enclosure Act, 17 acres (c 7ha) was allocated as public open space for Nottingham Arboretum. The Arboretum was designed by Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), the nurseryman and botanical publisher, and laid out by Nottingham Town Council between 1850 and 1852. It opened to the public in 1852 and was the first public park to open in Nottingham.
Parks & Gardens

Following the Nottingham Inclosure Act of 1845 – a visionary project to create a green network around the growing city, to provide green spaces for relaxation, contemplation, learning, exercise and clean air – the Arboretum was the first public park opened in Nottingham. The layout and design was carried out under the supervision of Samuel Curtis, a botanist and horticultural publicist in 1850 who had previously been involved with the layout of Victoria Park in the East End of London in 1842.

The main aim of the design for Arboretum was to take advantage of the landscape setting whilst providing an interlinking network of walkways and socialising areas. As a result over 1010 specimen trees and shrubs were planted along with winding paths and sweeping lawns. The plantings were laid out in what is known as ‘The Natural Order’ to provide an educational link to nature through botanical interpretation. Some of the mature trees and shrubs growing here are living relics of the original collection such as the Lime Trees which were planted as nursery trees. There are currently over 800 trees of 65 species. The layout of the park is relatively unchanged and as a result the Arboretum is Grade II listed on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens maintained by English Heritage and contains 9 Grade II Listed structures within its layout, providing a key asset to Nottingham’s Victorian Heritage.
Nottingham City Council

Horticultural Hall, Audubon Park, New Orleans


Horticultural Hall, Audubon Park, New Orleands, LA
1907-1911
Published: The Rotograph Co, New York (In operation, 1904-11)

The nascent park accommodated a World’s Fair soon thereafter, the World Cotton Centennial of 1884. After the closing of the fair, the park’s development began in earnest. Most of the fair’s buildings were demolished, with the exception of Horticultural Hall – which remained in the park until destroyed in the 1915 New Orleans hurricane.
Wikipedia.

Street view, approximate location (hall stood between the end of the Alley of Oaks and the bandstand)

Dance Pavilion, Euclid Beach Park, Cleveland, Ohio, USA


Interior of the largest and finest dancing pavilion in the world
Euclid Beach Park
Postmarked: 1912
Publisher: Century Post Card Co, Cleveland, Ohio

Approximate location.

Location of buildings & rides overlaid on more recent view.

In 1895, five Cleveland businessmen opened Euclid Beach Park. Located on the southern shore of Lake Erie, on the east side of Cleveland, this parcel of land would become a magical place that was more than just an amusement park-it was an institution of the community. However, in 1900, “the Beach” faced financial collapse under the original owners. After being rescued by the Humphrey family, Euclid Beach began its ascendancy in the 1901 season.
Euclid Beach Park

Euclid Beach Park was built abutting a beach on Lake Erie, which was part of the attraction, and, for a time, a principal part of the Park’s attraction. An early addition to the park was its dance hall. After the Humphreys acquired the park, many more attractions were made part of Euclid Beach. . . .Many structures still standing on the Euclid Beach site after its closing, including the famous dance hall, were destroyed in a series of arson fires.
Wikipedia.

1895 – Euclid Beach Park opens. The Euclid Beach Park Company, owners of the park, had erected a fence surrounding the property, located eight miles east of Cleveland on the southern shore of Lake Erie. Admission was charged for patrons to enjoy a beer garden, games of chance, and a few mechanical amusement rides. The five original structures were: The Pier, German Village, Theater, Dance Pavilion, and Bath House.
Euclid Beach Park