Sainte-Dévote Chapel, Monaco


MONTE-CARLO Sainte-Dévote
c. 1920 (postmarked 1921)
Publisher: Levy Sons & Co

Google Street View.

Sainte-Dévote Chapel is a Roman Catholic chapel dedicated to Saint Devota, the patron saint of Monaco. The chapel was first mentioned in archived documents dated 1070, built against the wall of Vallon des Gaumates, on the space now occupied by the Chapel of Relics. It was restored in the 16th century. In 1606, Prince Honoré II added a span, followed by a porch in 1637. The façade was rebuilt in 1870 and refurbished further in 1891 in “18th-century Neo-Greek” style. The stained-glass windows were made by Nicolas Lorin of Chartres. The glass windows were destroyed during the bombing of Monaco during World War II and were restored by Fassi Cadet of Nice in 1948. The chapel became the parish church in 1887.
Wikipedia.

The current Sainte-Dévote Church is located in the Valley of the Gaumates, in approximately the same place (according to legend) as where the boat with the martyred body of the Saint was beached and where her cadavre was buried. The first chapel which was consecrated to Devota was located on the same site as the ancient temple dedicated to Hercules and was probably built directly over this temple, in order to promote the spread of Christianity.
Government of Monaco website

In the very early 4th century, in Corsica (which was a Roman province at that time) the Roman governor, Diocletian, ordered the great persecution of the Christians. A young Christian, Devote, was arrested, imprisoned and tortured. She died without denying her faith. After her death, the governor of the province ordered for her body to be burnt, but the Christians saved her body and placed it on a boat bound for Africa, where they believed she would receive a proper Christian burial. Right from the first hours of the crossing, a storm overtook the boat. Then, a dove flew out from Devote?s mouth and without incident guided the boat to Monaco where it ran aground in the Gaumates (site of the present-day Saint Devote church).
[continued]
Sainte Devote

Windsor Castle, England


East Terrace, Windsor Castle
Published: E. Marshall, Castle Hill Ltd/Valentine & Sons

Street View

Official site

The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion of England by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by the reigning monarch and is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. The castle’s lavish early 19th-century State Apartments were described by the art historian Hugh Roberts as “a superb and unrivalled sequence of rooms widely regarded as the finest and most complete expression of later Georgian taste”. Inside the castle walls is the 15th-century St George’s Chapel, considered by the historian John Martin Robinson to be “one of the supreme achievements of English Perpendicular Gothic” design.

Originally designed to protect Norman dominance around the outskirts of London and oversee a strategically important part of the River Thames, Windsor Castle was built as a motte-and-bailey, with three wards surrounding a central mound. Gradually replaced with stone fortifications, the castle withstood a prolonged siege during the First Barons’ War at the start of the 13th century. Henry III built a luxurious royal palace within the castle during the middle of the century, and Edward III went further, rebuilding the palace to make an even grander set of buildings in what would become “the most expensive secular building project of the entire Middle Ages in England”.[6] Edward’s core design lasted through the Tudor period, during which Henry VIII and Elizabeth I made increasing use of the castle as a royal court and centre for diplomatic entertainment.

Windsor Castle survived the tumultuous period of the English Civil War, when it was used as a military headquarters by Parliamentary forces and a prison for Charles I. At the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, Charles II rebuilt much of Windsor Castle with the help of the architect Hugh May, creating a set of extravagant Baroque interiors that are still admired. After a period of neglect during the 18th century, George III and George IV renovated and rebuilt Charles II’s palace at colossal expense, producing the current design of the State Apartments, full of Rococo, Gothic and Baroque furnishings. Queen Victoria made a few minor changes to the castle, which became the centre for royal entertainment for much of her reign.
Wikipedia

Street View (overview)


Long Walk. Windsor Castle.
Postmarked 1907.
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

A dramatic first impression is exactly what Charles II intended when he created the Long Walk between 1683 and 1685. As part of a major programme of improvements to the Castle, the King restored Windsor’s Great Park, which had been divided and sold off by Parliamentarians during the Civil War. By planting trees, taking land out of arable use and bringing in over 500 deer from Germany and Richmond Park, he turned the land south of the Castle back into a great royal hunting forest. To connect the Castle and the Great Park, he ordered a ruler-straight avenue of four rows of elms stretching for two and a half miles.
Royal Collection Trust

Read moreWindsor Castle, England

Palace of Fontainebleau, France


Palais de FONTAINEBLEAU – Cour des Adieux.

Google Street View.

Official Website
Media Center for Art History (panorama views of rooms)
17th century plan

Used by the kings of France from the 12th century, the hunting lodge of Fontainebleau, standing in the heart of the vast forest of the Ile-de-France in the Seine-et-Marne region, was transformed, enlarged and embellished in the 16th century by King François I, who wanted to make it a “new Rome”. Surrounded by an immense park, the palace, to which notable Italian artists contributed, combines Renaissance and French artistic traditions. The need to expand and decorate this immense palace created the conditions for the survival of a true artistic centre.

The construction of the palace began in 1528. The modifications undertaken later by François I’s successors and carried out on different scales until the 19th century have left their imprint on the physionomy of the present complex, which today comprises five courtyards placed in an irregular manner and surrounded by an ensemble of buildings and gardens.
UNESCO World Heritage listing


FONTAINEBLEAU — Le Palais. Perspective du Chateau et de l’Etang
Published Levy & Neurdein Reunis, 1920s

Google Street View.

PALAIS DE FONTAINEBLEAU
Pavillon Louis XV – Entrée du Musée Chinois et l’Étang aux Carpes
Louis XV Pavilion – Entrance to the Chinese Museum and the carps pond.
Published by Musées Nationaux

Read morePalace of Fontainebleau, France

King’s College, Cambridge


Cambridge, King’s College Screen and Gate.
Letter on back dated 1918
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

King’s College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England. Formally The King’s College of Our Lady and Saint Nicholas in Cambridge, the college lies beside the River Cam and faces out onto King’s Parade in the centre of the city. King’s was founded in 1441 by Henry VI soon after he had founded its sister college in Eton. However, the King’s plans for the college were disrupted by the Wars of the Roses and the resultant scarcity of funds, as well as his eventual deposition. Little progress was made on the project until in 1508 Henry VII began to take an interest in the college, most likely as a political move to legitimise his new position. The building of the college’s chapel, begun in 1446, was finally finished in 1544 during the reign of Henry VIII.

King’s College Chapel is regarded as one of the greatest examples of late Gothic English architecture. It has the world’s largest fan vault, while the chapel’s stained-glass windows and wooden chancel screen are considered some of the finest from their era.
Wikipedia.


King’s College Gateway, Cambridge.
Postmarked 1909.
Publisher: O. Flammel for Stengel & Co., London


Cambridge. King’s College Chapel.
Postmarked 1952.
Pubisher: Photochrom Co.

Tower of London, London


The Tower of London
1900s
Publisher: H. Vertigen & Co (1906-9)


I’ve marked the locations of the cards below on this map. (Click for larger version.) The base map comes from Hipkiss’s Scanned Old Maps

Historic Royal Places: Tower of London (aimed at visitors)

UNESCO World Heritage Listing

Authorised Guide to the Tower of London, 1904 (on Project Gutenberg)

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, which is separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins), although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under kings Richard I, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.
Wikipedia

The Tower of London was founded by King William the Conqueror. After his coronation on Christmas Day, 1066, William hastily ordered the erection of a wooden fortress between the Thames and the ancient Roman wall which then surrounded London. William began the building of what is now termed as the White Tower ten years later. A rectangular stone keep of Caen stone, designed as an impregnable fortress and as an impressive and awesome demonstration of his power to the Londoners. With ramparts which were fifteen feet thick at the base and walls soaring ninety feet high, the dominating shadow of the Tower loomed forebodingly over the huddled wooden buildings of medieval London, a visible expression of Norman power.
English Monarchs: The Tower of London in the Middle Ages


On the back:
TOWER OF LONDON
The Middle tower
The Middle Tower forms the principal entrance to the Tower of London, and protects the bridge across the most. It is the only Tower outside the moat.</em?

MT on map
Google Street View.


The Tower of London, on the Terrace
1930s
Publisher: Photochrom

Area between Middle Tower and Byward Tower. Marked T on map
Google Street View.


Tower of London — Byward Tower — From the West
Publisher: Ministry of Works

Marked BT1 on map


The Tower of London. The Byward Tower.
1930s
Publisher: Photochrom

Marked BT2 on map


On back:
Tower of London
View along the Outer Ward looking towards the Byward Tower
On the right is the Bell Tower, in which were confined Queen Anne Boleyn, Queen Katharine Howard, Sir Thomas Moore, and other famous prisoners.

Publisher: Gale & Polden Ltd

Google Street View

Not marked on map, but between BT2 & TG.


Changing Guard, Tower of London
Publisher: Valentine Company

CG on map (approximately)


On back:
In the Beauchamp Tower.
Many of the stones bear inscriptions engraved by prisoners in former ages.
Publisher: Gale & Polden Ltd

Not marked in red on map but to the left of CG

Google Street View.

The main entrance to the inner ward would have been through a gatehouse, most likely in the west wall on the site of what is now Beauchamp Tower. The inner ward’s western curtain wall was rebuilt by Edward I. The 13th-century Beauchamp Tower marks the first large-scale use of brick as a building material in Britain, since the 5th-century departure of the Romans. The Beauchamp Tower is one of 13 towers that stud the curtain wall. Clockwise from the south-west corner they are: Bell, Beauchamp, Devereux, Flint, Bowyer, Brick, Martin, Constable, Broad Arrow, Salt, Lanthorn, Wakefield, and the Bloody Tower. While these towers provided positions from which flanking fire could be deployed against a potential enemy, they also contained accommodation.
Wikipedia.

The Beauchamp Tower is on the west side of Tower Green, facing the White Tower, and is on the inner wall between the Bell Tower on the south and the Devereux Tower on the north, being connected with both by a walk along the parapet. Its present name probably refers to the residence in it as a prisoner of Thomas, third Earl of Warwick, of the Beauchamp family, who was attainted under Richard II in 1397, but restored to his honours and liberty two years later under Henry IV. It is curious that the most interesting associations of the place should be connected with his successors in the earldom. Although built entirely for defensive purposes, we find it thus early used as a prison, and during the two following centuries it seems to have been regarded as one of the most convenient places in which to lodge prisoners of rank, and in consequence many of the most interesting mural inscriptions are to be found in its chambers.

In plan the Beauchamp Tower is semicircular, and it projects eighteen feet beyond the face of the wall. It consists of three storeys, of which the middle one is on a level with the rampart, on which it formerly opened. The whole building dates from the reign of Edward III. We enter at the south-east corner and ascend by a circular staircase to the middle chamber, which is spacious and has a large window, with a fire-place. Here are to be found most of the inscriptions, some having been brought from other chambers.
[Continues with some of the inscriptions]
Authorised Guide to the Tower of London, 1904 (on Project Gutenberg)


The Place of Execution, Tower of London

PE on map
Google Street View.


The Armoury, Tower of London
c.1910
Caption on back:
The Armoury, Tower of London
Is in the two upper floor of the White Tower. The rooms on the second floor contain Eastern Arms and armour, and more modern European arms. The main portion of the collection is in the Council Chamber, includes a series of equestrian figures in full equipment.

White Tower is marked as WT on map.


Tower of London
The Chapel of St John in the White Tower. The Ambulatory.
Publisher: Ministry of Works

White Tower is marked as WT on map.


Portcullis in Bloody Tower
Tower of London
Publisher: Gale & Polden Ltd

On the back:
Bloody Tower
Interior, showing the ancient portcullis and windlass for raising and lowering

P on map (approximately, it’s above the entrance to the tower)


Tower of London. Traitor’s Gate.
1930s
Publisher: Photochrom

TG on map
Google Street View.


The Tower of London. Entrance of Promenade.
1930s
Publisher: Photochrom

E on map
Google Street View.


The Tower of London, & Tower Bridge
Publisher: Photochrom
1930s


The Tower of London
1930s
Publisher: Valentine