Sainte-Dévote Chapel, Monaco


MONTE-CARLO Sainte-Dévote
c. 1920 (postmarked 1921)
Publisher: Levy Sons & Co

Google Street View.

Sainte-Dévote Chapel is a Roman Catholic chapel dedicated to Saint Devota, the patron saint of Monaco. The chapel was first mentioned in archived documents dated 1070, built against the wall of Vallon des Gaumates, on the space now occupied by the Chapel of Relics. It was restored in the 16th century. In 1606, Prince Honoré II added a span, followed by a porch in 1637. The façade was rebuilt in 1870 and refurbished further in 1891 in “18th-century Neo-Greek” style. The stained-glass windows were made by Nicolas Lorin of Chartres. The glass windows were destroyed during the bombing of Monaco during World War II and were restored by Fassi Cadet of Nice in 1948. The chapel became the parish church in 1887.
Wikipedia.

The current Sainte-Dévote Church is located in the Valley of the Gaumates, in approximately the same place (according to legend) as where the boat with the martyred body of the Saint was beached and where her cadavre was buried. The first chapel which was consecrated to Devota was located on the same site as the ancient temple dedicated to Hercules and was probably built directly over this temple, in order to promote the spread of Christianity.
Government of Monaco website

In the very early 4th century, in Corsica (which was a Roman province at that time) the Roman governor, Diocletian, ordered the great persecution of the Christians. A young Christian, Devote, was arrested, imprisoned and tortured. She died without denying her faith. After her death, the governor of the province ordered for her body to be burnt, but the Christians saved her body and placed it on a boat bound for Africa, where they believed she would receive a proper Christian burial. Right from the first hours of the crossing, a storm overtook the boat. Then, a dove flew out from Devote?s mouth and without incident guided the boat to Monaco where it ran aground in the Gaumates (site of the present-day Saint Devote church).
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Sainte Devote

Palace of Fontainebleau, France


Palais de FONTAINEBLEAU – Cour des Adieux.

Google Street View.

Official Website
Media Center for Art History (panorama views of rooms)
17th century plan

Used by the kings of France from the 12th century, the hunting lodge of Fontainebleau, standing in the heart of the vast forest of the Ile-de-France in the Seine-et-Marne region, was transformed, enlarged and embellished in the 16th century by King François I, who wanted to make it a “new Rome”. Surrounded by an immense park, the palace, to which notable Italian artists contributed, combines Renaissance and French artistic traditions. The need to expand and decorate this immense palace created the conditions for the survival of a true artistic centre.

The construction of the palace began in 1528. The modifications undertaken later by François I’s successors and carried out on different scales until the 19th century have left their imprint on the physionomy of the present complex, which today comprises five courtyards placed in an irregular manner and surrounded by an ensemble of buildings and gardens.
UNESCO World Heritage listing


FONTAINEBLEAU — Le Palais. Perspective du Chateau et de l’Etang
Published Levy & Neurdein Reunis, 1920s

Google Street View.

PALAIS DE FONTAINEBLEAU
Pavillon Louis XV – Entrée du Musée Chinois et l’Étang aux Carpes
Louis XV Pavilion – Entrance to the Chinese Museum and the carps pond.
Published by Musées Nationaux

Read morePalace of Fontainebleau, France

Tower of London, London


The Tower of London
1900s
Publisher: H. Vertigen & Co (1906-9)


I’ve marked the locations of the cards below on this map. (Click for larger version.) The base map comes from Hipkiss’s Scanned Old Maps

Historic Royal Places: Tower of London (aimed at visitors)

UNESCO World Heritage Listing

Authorised Guide to the Tower of London, 1904 (on Project Gutenberg)

Read moreTower of London, London