Nottingham Castle, Nottingham, England


The Castle Gateway, Nottingham
Postmarked: 1906
Publisher: Frederick Hartmann (1902-1909)

Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England, in a commanding position on a natural promontory known as “Castle Rock”, with cliffs 130 feet (40 m) high to the south and west. In the Middle Ages it was a major royal fortress and occasional royal residence. In decline by the 16th century, it was largely demolished in 1651. The Duke of Newcastle later built a mansion on the site, which was burnt down by rioters in 1831 and left as a ruin. It was later rebuilt to house an art gallery and museum, which remain in use. Little of the original castle survives, but sufficient portions remain to give an impression of the layout of the site.
Wikipedia.


Castle
c.1910
Publisher: R. Fleeman & Sons

Google Street View (approximate)

By 1831 Nottingham had become infamous for its squalor with some of the worst slums in the Empire. The Castle was owned by Henry Pelham Clinton, the fourth Duke of Newcastle, who left it vacant. He was a vehement opponent of electoral reform and he led the defeat of a bill to extend the vote to more people and end corrupt voting practices. When news reached Nottingham that the bill had been voted down, the town rioted. Houses and shops were attacked, and the Castle stormed by a mob. The remaining furnishings were stripped, statues destroyed, and a great fire lit in the basement that consumed the whole building. The people of Nottingham watched as the Palace burned like a giant bonfire. As a silent rebuke to the town, the Duke left the ruined shell of the building unrepaired for 45 years.

In 1875, after coming to an agreement with the sixth Duke, architect T.C. Hine was tasked with renovating Nottingham Castle and turning it into a Museum of Fine Art. This work was completed in 1878 and the Castle became the first municipal museum of art in the country. Opened under the stewardship of curator George Harry Wallis, the museum was designed to inspire the creative and curious imaginations of the people of Nottingham, which by this time had become a world-leader in the design and manufacture of lace. The public art gallery sparked inspiration for pattern designers and other artisans in the town’s industries. Luckily, the castle survived a potential second arson attack in 1913 when Suffragette bomber Eileen Casey was arrested in Nottingham with a hatbox full of explosives with the Castle as one of her possible targets!
Nottingham Castle


The Castle, Nottingham
1900s
Publisher: Frederick Hartmann (1902-1909)