Bedroom, Mount Vernon, USA


Martha Washington Bed Room
On the back:
Mrs. Washington’s Room, in the mansion at Mount Vernon, is in the attic. After the death of General Washington, Mrs. Washington occupied this room, chosing it because the dormer window overlooked the grave of her husband. It was here that she died. The furniture and bangings are reproductions of the originals.
Beautiful Washinton Quality Series

c.1910
Publisher: B.S. Reynolds Co, Washington, D.C.

Google Maps (location).

Martha Washington resided in the southwest garret bedchamber until her own death in May of 1802. Her life on the third floor was not unsocial or isolated. The garret rooms were vital living spaces for Mrs. Washington, her grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. . . . At the time of Martha Washington’s death, the inventory of “the Room Mrs Washington now Keeps” listed a bed, bedstead and mattress, oval looking glass, three chairs, a table, carpet, and fireplace equipment. The furnishings plan also called for a low post bedstead, table, carpet, and Windsor chairs.
George Washington’s Mount Vernon

Old St. John’s Church, Richmond, Virginia


Old St. John’s Church Interior, Richmond, Va.
In 1775 a convention was held in this historic church to deliberate upon the oppressive measures adopted by the British Government for enforcing the collection of taxes levied upon the Colonies. Many members of the convention hesitated to commit Virginia to any act of resistance, but Patrick Henry though only 39 years old, flashed the electric spark which exploded with fiery eloquence, “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of the chains of slavery? Forbid it Almighty God I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty or give me death.”

During the delivery of this immortal speech Henry stood in pew 72, now marked by white tablet shown in this view.

Postmarked 1946

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