Teith & Ben Ledi, Callander, Scotland


Teith & Ben Ledi, Callander
c.1920
Publisher: Valentine

The River Teith is a river in Scotland, which is formed from the confluence of two smaller rivers, the Garbh Uisge (River Leny) and Eas Gobhain at Callander, Stirlingshire. It flows into the River Forth near Drip north-west of Stirling. . . . The ‘Brig o’ Teith’ was constructed in 1535 by Robert Spittal, a Royal tailor to Mary Queen of Scots. According to Charles Roger in ‘A Week at Bridge of Allan 1851’, a ferryman refused Spittal passage across the Teith as he did not have his purse and could not pay. The bridge was built in retaliation.
Wikipedia.

Google Street View.

Loch Katrine, Scotland


The Silver Strand, Loch Katrine
Publisher: Valentine

Loch Katrine is now owned by Scottish Water, and has been the primary water reservoir for much of the city of Glasgow and its surrounding areas since 1859.
Wikipedia.

BEAUTIFUL Loch Katrine in all thy majesty so grand,
Oh! how charming and fascinating is thy silver strand!
Thou certainly art most lovely, and worthy to be seen,
Especially thy beautiful bay and shrubberies green.

Then away to Loch Katrine in the summer time,
And feast on its scenery most lovely and sublime;
There’s no other scene can surpass in fair Scotland,
It’s surrounded by mountains and trees most grand.

And as I gaze upon it, let me pause and think,
How many people in Glasgow of its water drink,
That’s conveyed to them in pipes from its placid lake,
And are glad to get its water their thirst to slake.

From “Loch Katerine” by William McGonagall

Loch Lubnaig, Scotland


Loch Lubnaig
c.1910
Publisher: Birn Brothers, London

Google Street View (approximate).

Loch Lubnaig is a small freshwater loch near Callander in the Stirling council area, Scottish Highlands. It lies in the former county of Perthshire. It is part of the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park. The loch nestles in the space between Ben Ledi and Ben Vorlich. Fed by the River Balvaig from the north and drained by the Garbh Uisge to the south, Loch Lubnaig offers fishing from the shore while canoes can be rented at the north end.
Wikipedia.

Stirling Castle, Scotland


Stirling Castle
c.1910
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View.

Stirling Castle was the key to the kingdom of Scotland, dominating a vast volcanic rock above the river Forth at the meeting point between Lowlands and Highlands. Its origins are ancient and over the centuries it grew into a great royal residence and a powerful stronghold. During the Wars of Independence, which were civil wars among the Scots as well as a struggle between Scotland and England, the castle changed hands eight times in 50 years. And it is no accident that famous battles such as Stirling Bridge and Bannockburn took place within sight of its walls. In times of peace Scottish royalty came to Stirling to enjoy its comforts, the superb hunting and to hold court – the castle was often the centre of government.
Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle was first mentioned around 1110, and many royal dramas unfolded here. Until the Union of the Crowns in 1603, almost every Scottish monarch had either lived in the castle, or been crowned or died here.
. . .
The three main enclosures within the castle are the:
outer defences, on the main line of approach
main enclosure, at the summit of the rock, bounded in the south by the Forework and encircled by a defensive wall
Nether Bailey, to the north.

At the castle’s heart is the Inner Close, a square formed of the principal buildings for royal occupation.
Historic Environment Scotland