Glen Coe, Scotland


Glencoe
Postmarked 1934
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View.

Glen Coe is a glen of volcanic origins, in the Highlands of Scotland. . . . The main settlement is the village of Glencoe located at the foot of the glen. Glen Coe is regarded as the home of Scottish mountaineering and is popular with hillwalkers and climbers. On the 13 February 1692, in the aftermath of the Jacobite uprising of 1689, an incident known as the Massacre of Glencoe took place in the glen. Thirty-eight men from Clan MacDonald of Glencoe were killed by government forces who were billeted with them on the grounds that they had not been prompt in pledging allegiance to the new monarchs, William II and Mary II. The Glen is named after the River Coe which runs through it. The name of the river may predate the Gaelic language, as its meaning is not known. It is possible that the name stems from an individual personal name, Comhan.
Wikipedia.

Cathedral and Flora Macdonald’s Statue, Inverness, Scotland


Cathedral and Flora Macdonald’s Statue, Inverness
Dated 1914

Google Street View.

Monument to Flora Macdonald, Castle Hill, Inverness,” by Andrew Davidson (1841-1925). 1896-99. Bronze group, including the collie dog. The monument stands in front of the Sheriff Court, high on Castle Hill, Inverness, so that, as John Gifford says, Flora is shown gazing “down the Great Glen” (197) — the valley of the River Ness. Flora Macdonald was the young woman who helped Bonnie Prince Charlie escape from Scotland after the Jacobites were routed at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. According to the “Inverness City Trail,” the statue of the Jacobite heroine was paid for” by the generosity of “Captain J. Henderson MacDonald of Caskieben, and of the 78th Highlanders.” As well as an inscription of Flora Macdonald’s name in the granite pedestal, there is a bronze plaque, in the shape of a shield, with a quotation in both Gaelic and English.
Victorian Web