Guildhall, York, England


York, Guildhall.
c.1910
Publisher: Francis Frith & Co, Reigate

York Guildhall is situated on the north bank of the River Ouse, behind the Mansion House. The hall was built in 1445 for the Guild of St Christopher and St George and the Corporation and was used as a meeting place for the guilds of York. The city’s guilds largely controlled the trade within York, oversaw the quality of the workmanship within the city and looked after their members’ interests. Due to damage caused by German bombs during a Baedeker air raid in 1942 which partially destroyed the building, the present Guildhall is a rebuilt version of the original fifteenth century structure and was opened by Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother in 1960.
Yorkshire Guide

The Guildhall has been around for a large part of York’s history. The current hall dates from the 15th century but it is built on the site of an earlier “common hall” which was referred to in a charter in 1256. The hall was built in 1445 for the ‘Guild of St Christopher and St George’ and the Corporation, the cost being divided equally between them. The accounts still exist and include a record of 3 pence given to the workmen to celebrate the laying of the foundations. A council meeting is recorded there in May of 1459. The whole site was taken over by the city corporation in 1549. Council meetings are still held on the site, now in the rather grand Victorian Council Chamber that was completed in 1891. When meetings weren’t taking place, the hall was put to all sorts of uses. It was sometimes a Court of Justice, including for the infamous trial of Margaret Clitherow for practising Catholicism in 1586. She was put to death for refusing to accept the jurisdiction of the Court.
History of York

Stonegate, York, England


Stonegate, York
1900s
Publisher: Shurey’s Publications

Google Street View.

The road has always been central to the City’s layout. Six feet below its pavement lies the Roman Via Praetoria, which connected the Basilica at the centre of the fortress to the bridge over the River Ouse and the civilian settlement on the other side. The Roman road may have given the street its name, although Francis Drake records in 1736: “It had this name given as is said from the vast quantity of stone lead through this street for the building of the cathedral.” Limestone for the construction of the Minster was indeed brought in from Tadcaster by river. Drake also records that, at the bottom of the street, was a spot called ‘cuckolds’ corner’ although he doesn’t explain why.
History of York

Stonegate has always been one of the major streets of York. It runs south-west from the junction with High and Low Petergate or via principalis, towards the River Ouse and the old Roman bridge, along the line of the via praetoria of the Roman fortress. The via praetoria linked the main fortress gate – under St Helen’s Square – to the headquarters building – under the Minster.
York Civic Trust

Heath Common, Heath, West Yorkshire, England


Heath Common, near Wakefield
Published: Valentine
Postmarked: 1908

Street View

Located 1.5 miles east of Wakefield the village of Heath lies within the registered Common, a large grassland with areas of scrub, and is a conservation area of historic and architectural importance.

The Common has been open land for hundreds of years, with enclosure fought against by people including the local naturalist Charles Waterton. It gained registered common status in the late 19th century. Five major houses now stand within the village including the Grade 1 listed Heath Hall. Some of the houses date from the 17th century.

Wakefield Council

Selby Abbey, Selby, Yorkshire


Tower & South Transept, Selby Abbey

Street View

It is one of the relatively few surviving abbey churches of the medieval period, and, although not a cathedral, is one of the biggest. It was founded by Benedict of Auxerre in 1069 and subsequently built by the de Lacy family.

On 31 May 1256, the Abbey was bestowed with the grant of a Mitre by Pope Alexander IV and from this date was a “Mitred Abbey”. This privilege fell in abeyance a number of times, but on 11 April 1308, Archbishop William Greenfield confirmed the grant, and Selby remained a “Mitred Abbey” until the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Archbishop Walter Giffard visited the monastery in 1275 by commission, and several monks and the Abbot were charged with a list of faults including loose living, (many complaints referred to misconduct with married women). In 1279 Archbishop William de Wickwane made a visitation, and found fault with the Abbot as he did not observe the rule of St Benedict, was not singing mass, preaching or teaching, and seldom attending chapter. Things had not improved much in 1306 when Archbishop William Greenfield visited and similar visitations in later years resulted in similar findings.

The community rebuilt the choir in the early fourteenth century, but in 1340, a fire destroyed the Chapter House, Dormitory, Treasury and part of the church. The damage was repaired and the decorated windows in the south aisle of the Nave were installed. In 1380-1 there was the abbot and twenty-five monks. In 1393 Pope Boniface IX granted an indulgence to pilgrims who contributed to the conservation of the chapel of the Holy Cross in the Abbey.

The fifteenth century saw more alterations to the Abbey. The perpendicular windows in the North Transept and at the west end of the nave were added and the Sedilia in the Sanctuary was added. One of the final additions was the Lathom Chapel, dedicated to St Catherine, east of the North Transept, in 1465.
Wikipedia.

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