Arboretum, Nottingham, England


Arboretum, Nottingham
Publisher: Stewart & Woolf, London

This might be the aviary, opposite the lake.

The park was designed as a botanical collection, in the “natural order”, and as a tranquil place in which to relax, forming a major attraction in the heart of Victorian Nottingham. From 1852 it was open free of charge on Sunday, Monday and Wednesday, but was 6d admission (equivalent to £2.74 in 2019)[5] on other days, or £1 (equivalent to £109.46 in 2019)[5] for a yearly permit.
Wikipedia.

The Enclosure Act of 1845 enclosed fields and meadows used by the burgesses or freeholders of the City of Nottingham to graze their animals. To compensate for the loss of the open space used for recreation, the Act allotted space for a series of places of public recreation and public walks. Some 130 acres (c 54ha) made up of Queen’s Walk and Queen’s Walk Park (Meadow Cricket Ground), Victoria Park, Robin Hood Chase, Corporation Oaks, St Ann’s Hill Avenue, Nottingham Arboretum, the General Cemetery, Waterloo Promenade, the Church Cemetery, and the Forest were created as public open spaces from the enclosures. Under the Enclosure Act, 17 acres (c 7ha) was allocated as public open space for Nottingham Arboretum. The Arboretum was designed by Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), the nurseryman and botanical publisher, and laid out by Nottingham Town Council between 1850 and 1852. It opened to the public in 1852 and was the first public park to open in Nottingham.
Parks & Gardens

Following the Nottingham Inclosure Act of 1845 – a visionary project to create a green network around the growing city, to provide green spaces for relaxation, contemplation, learning, exercise and clean air – the Arboretum was the first public park opened in Nottingham. The layout and design was carried out under the supervision of Samuel Curtis, a botanist and horticultural publicist in 1850 who had previously been involved with the layout of Victoria Park in the East End of London in 1842.

The main aim of the design for Arboretum was to take advantage of the landscape setting whilst providing an interlinking network of walkways and socialising areas. As a result over 1010 specimen trees and shrubs were planted along with winding paths and sweeping lawns. The plantings were laid out in what is known as ‘The Natural Order’ to provide an educational link to nature through botanical interpretation. Some of the mature trees and shrubs growing here are living relics of the original collection such as the Lime Trees which were planted as nursery trees. There are currently over 800 trees of 65 species. The layout of the park is relatively unchanged and as a result the Arboretum is Grade II listed on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens maintained by English Heritage and contains 9 Grade II Listed structures within its layout, providing a key asset to Nottingham’s Victorian Heritage.
Nottingham City Council

Deer, Welbeck Park, England


Deer in Welbeck Park
Publisher: Valentine

Google Maps

Welbeck has constantly evolved over the centuries – from a Premonstratensian Abbey founded in 1153, to a Cavalier residence in the 17th century; from English Gothic to the New Works of the nineteenth century with their mysterious labyrinth of tunnels. The MOD used many of the estate buildings as a Sixth Form College from 1954 to 2005. . . . Today Welbeck is still a working estate and contains a Grade 2 registered historic park designed in 1748 by Francis Richardson; ancient woodlands and forestry; a beautiful chain of lakes; farmland and grazing; a deer park; and some of the country’s most important rural heritage buildings.
Welbeck

Colwick Hall, Nottingham, England


Colwick Hall, Nottingham
Postmarked 1907

Google Street View.

Colwick Hall Hotel.

Colwick Hall was an English country house in Colwick, Nottinghamshire. It is now a hotel. The building is Grade II* listed. Colwick Hall is constructed of red brick, with ashlar dressings and hipped slate roofs with a 2-storey central block and single-storey wings. The frontage has four Ionic pillars surmounted by a pediment. . . . John Musters replaced all of the older buildings with the present Hall in 1775–1776. The new house was built by local builder, Samuel Stretton, from designs of John Carr of York. It was enclosed with a moat, crossed by drawbridge on the north side. . . . In 1896 the Hall was sold to the Nottingham Racecourse Company – the racecourse opened in 1892, the Hall became a public house and the rest of the buildings were used to accommodate grooms and jockeys.
Wikipedia.

Nottingham Castle, Nottingham, England


The Castle Gateway, Nottingham
Postmarked: 1906
Publisher: Frederick Hartmann (1902-1909)

Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England, in a commanding position on a natural promontory known as “Castle Rock”, with cliffs 130 feet (40 m) high to the south and west. In the Middle Ages it was a major royal fortress and occasional royal residence. In decline by the 16th century, it was largely demolished in 1651. The Duke of Newcastle later built a mansion on the site, which was burnt down by rioters in 1831 and left as a ruin. It was later rebuilt to house an art gallery and museum, which remain in use. Little of the original castle survives, but sufficient portions remain to give an impression of the layout of the site.
Wikipedia.


Castle
c.1910
Publisher: R. Fleeman & Sons

Google Street View (approximate)

By 1831 Nottingham had become infamous for its squalor with some of the worst slums in the Empire. The Castle was owned by Henry Pelham Clinton, the fourth Duke of Newcastle, who left it vacant. He was a vehement opponent of electoral reform and he led the defeat of a bill to extend the vote to more people and end corrupt voting practices. When news reached Nottingham that the bill had been voted down, the town rioted. Houses and shops were attacked, and the Castle stormed by a mob. The remaining furnishings were stripped, statues destroyed, and a great fire lit in the basement that consumed the whole building. The people of Nottingham watched as the Palace burned like a giant bonfire. As a silent rebuke to the town, the Duke left the ruined shell of the building unrepaired for 45 years.

In 1875, after coming to an agreement with the sixth Duke, architect T.C. Hine was tasked with renovating Nottingham Castle and turning it into a Museum of Fine Art. This work was completed in 1878 and the Castle became the first municipal museum of art in the country. Opened under the stewardship of curator George Harry Wallis, the museum was designed to inspire the creative and curious imaginations of the people of Nottingham, which by this time had become a world-leader in the design and manufacture of lace. The public art gallery sparked inspiration for pattern designers and other artisans in the town’s industries. Luckily, the castle survived a potential second arson attack in 1913 when Suffragette bomber Eileen Casey was arrested in Nottingham with a hatbox full of explosives with the Castle as one of her possible targets!
Nottingham Castle


The Castle, Nottingham
1900s
Publisher: Frederick Hartmann (1902-1909)

Trent Bridge & Midlands Industrial Exhibition, Nottingham, England


Trent Bridge, Nottingham
c.1904
Publisher: “S & Co, Nottm”

Midlands Industrial Exhibition in background.

Google Street View.

Constructed in an eye-catching Mughal (Indian) style, the steel-framed main building had two floors and was named the ‘Ivory Palace’. Its construction was swift with two different contractors working from either end, although reputedly there was a problem when they met in the middle as the alignment was discovered to be a few inches awry. The grounds housed a Japanese tea house, Canadian water chute (nearly 100 feet high and with a 600 foot slope), an American roller coaster, ‘Tom Thumb’ miniature railway, ‘Hampton Court maze’, and a ‘Fairy River’ that took visitors through caverns past walls set with magical scenes and down ‘a lane of stalactites a mile long’.

Unfortunately, the ‘greatest thing’ lasted a mere 14 months as on the night of 4 July 1904 an electrical fault in one of the Fairy River caverns caused a fire and while all the visitors were successfully evacuated, the conflagration spread rapidly across the site with flames leaping hundreds of feet into the air and threatening houses in nearby streets.
Picture Nottingham


The Exhibition, Nottingham
c.1904
Publisher: Stewart & Woolf

On the back, in the message section, this card has this typed:

Dear Auntie,
Nottingham is noted for many things and amongst others as being the birth-places and home of the Fountain Head Tea, packed by Smith Fowler & Co. They sold tea to Grandma 80 years ago and are selling it to us today. We cannot get any other so reliable.
Your affectionately, DOLLY


Trent Bridges, Nottingham
c.1910

Town Arms (now Brewhouse & Kitchen) on the left.

Google Street View

Trent Bridge is an iron and stone road bridge across the River Trent in Nottingham, England. It is the principal river crossing for entrance to the city from the south, although the upstream Clifton Bridge is both larger and busier. . . . The bridge was designed by Marriott Ogle Tarbotton. Construction started in 1868 and was completed in 1871 by Derbyshire iron maker, Andrew Handyside. The general contractor was Benton and Woodiwiss of Derby. It was completed for a cost of £30,000 (equivalent to £2,813,922 as of 2019). There were three main cast iron arch spans each 100 feet (30 m) braced by wrought iron girders. The width between the parapets was 40 feet (12 m). It is a Grade II listed building. The carving on the bridge was executed by Mawer and Ingle of Leeds. The new Trent Bridge formed part of a series of works along the banks of the river to improve flood defences by the construction of stepped, stone embankments.
Wikipedia.


Trent Bridge, Nottingham
Postmarked 1950
Publisher: Valentine & Sons