Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England


Trent Bridges, Notthingham
c.1910

Town Arms (now Brewhouse & Kitchen) on the left.

Google Street View

Trent Bridge is an iron and stone road bridge across the River Trent in Nottingham, England. It is the principal river crossing for entrance to the city from the south, although the upstream Clifton Bridge is both larger and busier. . . . The bridge was designed by Marriott Ogle Tarbotton. Construction started in 1868 and was completed in 1871 by Derbyshire iron maker, Andrew Handyside. The general contractor was Benton and Woodiwiss of Derby. It was completed for a cost of £30,000 (equivalent to £2,813,922 as of 2019). There were three main cast iron arch spans each 100 feet (30 m) braced by wrought iron girders. The width between the parapets was 40 feet (12 m). It is a Grade II listed building. The carving on the bridge was executed by Mawer and Ingle of Leeds. The new Trent Bridge formed part of a series of works along the banks of the river to improve flood defences by the construction of stepped, stone embankments.
Wikipedia.


Trent Bridge, Notthingham
Postmarked 1950
Publisher: Valentine & Sons


Trent Bridge, Notthingham
1900s
Publisher: “S & Co, Nottm”

Midlands Industrial Exhibition in background.

Google Street View.

Constructed in an eye-catching Mughal (Indian) style, the steel-framed main building had two floors and was named the ‘Ivory Palace’. Its construction was swift with two different contractors working from either end, although reputedly there was a problem when they met in the middle as the alignment was discovered to be a few inches awry. The grounds housed a Japanese tea house, Canadian water chute (nearly 100 feet high and with a 600 foot slope), an American roller coaster, ‘Tom Thumb’ miniature railway, ‘Hampton Court maze’, and a ‘Fairy River’ that took visitors through caverns past walls set with magical scenes and down ‘a lane of stalactites a mile long’.

Unfortunately, the ‘greatest thing’ lasted a mere 14 months as on the night of 4 July 1904 an electrical fault in one of the Fairy River caverns caused a fire and while all the visitors were successfully evacuated, the conflagration spread rapidly across the site with flames leaping hundreds of feet into the air and threatening houses in nearby streets.
Picture Nottingham