Morecambe, England


The Central Promenade, Morecambe
c.1910
“This beautiful Series of Fine Art Post Cards is supplied free exclusively by Brett’s Publications, comprising ‘My Pocket Novels,’ ‘Keepsake Novels,” and ‘Something to Read.'”

Google Street View.

The settlement started to be referred to as “Morecambe”, possibly after the harbour and railway. In 1889, the new name was officially adopted. Morecambe was a thriving seaside resort in the mid-20th century. While the resort of Blackpool attracted holiday-makers predominantly from the Lancashire mill towns, Morecambe had more visitors from Yorkshire (due to its railway connection) and Scotland. Mill workers from Bradford and further afield in West Yorkshire would holiday at Morecambe, with some retiring there. This gave Morecambe the nickname “Bradford on Sea”.
Wikipedia.

Birthplace of Richard Seddon (NZ Premier), Eccleston, England


Mr. Seddon’s birthplace, near St. Helen’s, Lancashire
Dated: 1906
Jones & Coleman, Auckland, N.Z.

This is a New Zealand postcard of an English house.

Google Street View.

Richard John Seddon PC (22 June 1845 – 10 June 1906) was a New Zealand politician who served as the 15th Premier (Prime Minister) of New Zealand from 1893 until his death. Seddon was born in Eccleston, St Helens, Lancashire, England, England. He arrived in New Zealand in 1866 to join an uncle in the West Coast goldfields.[3] His prominence in local politics gained him a seat in the House of Representatives in 1879. Seddon became a key member of the Liberal Party under the leadership of John Ballance. When the Liberal Government came to power in 1891 Seddon was appointed to several portfolios, including Minister of Public Works. Seddon succeeded to the leadership of the Liberal Party following Ballance’s death in 1893, inheriting a bill for women’s suffrage, which was passed the same year despite Seddon’s opposition to it.
Wikipedia.

Shire Hall, Lancaster, England


Interior of Shire Hall | Lancaster
c.1910
Publisher: Stewart & Woolf

Google Street View (exterior).

This magnificent ten-sided room is Joseph Gandy’s masterpiece. Completed in 1802, its semi-circle of Gothic pillars carry not only the arches which support the timber ceiling over the main part of the court room but also the arches of the plaster vault over the surrounding aisle. Still used as a working courtroom on rare occasions, today the Shire Hall is also the centrepiece for one the UK’s finest displays of chivalric heraldry.
Lancaster Castle

In the last two decades of the century, around £30,000 was spent rebuilding Lancaster’s county gaol. Architect Thomas Harrison was commissioned to complete the work. Under his auspices, the Gaoler’s House was built in 1788 in a Gothic style. Separate prisons were built for men and women. The Shire Hall and Crown Court were complete by 1798. Harrison had to divide his time between Lancaster and designing and building Chester Castle’s Shire Hall and Courts; work at Lancaster slowed, partly because of dwindling funds due to war with France, and Harrison was released from the work as the Justices of the Peace felt it was taking too long. The artist Robert Freebairn was paid £500 to paint twelve watercolours of the work in 1800 to be presented to the Duke of Lancaster, King George III. In 1802 the castle received more funding and Joseph Gandy was commissioned to complete the interiors of the Shire Hall and Crown Court.
Wikipedia.