Mercery Lane, Canterbury, England


Canterbury. Mercery Lane.
c.1915
Publisher: E. Crow & Son, Canterbury

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To return again to the High street on the northern side of which opposite to St Margaret s street is a narrow lane called Mercery lane anciently Le Mercerie no doubt from that trade having been principally carried forward in it Before the time of the great rebellion there was a colonade on each side of it like that formerly on London Bridge The houses in it are the most ancient of any in the city each story projecting upwards so as almost to meet at the top There has however been a considerable improvement in this lane like the rest of the city many houses have been new fronted The south west corner of it is the site of one of those ancient inns which Chaucer mentions as being frequented by the pilgrims in his time and the inner part of the adjoining premises where every information can be obtained for the stranger and traveller gives some idea still of the manner in which these sort of receptacles for travellers were built This lane leads to the entrance into the precincts of the Cathedral the principal gate of which is opposite to it
“Canterbury Guide”, Henry Ward, 1843, p 24

One of the most famous of all hostelries used to be the “Chequers of the Hope” at the angle of Mercery Lane with the main street, the exact corner where the crowd of pilgrims that had entered by the West Gate turned aside to gain Prior Goldstone’s entrance to the cathedral precincts. But, alas! though the name remains, the building was almost entirely destroyed by fire in 1865. . . . Mercery Lane the name (like that of Butchery Lane, the next narrow turning to the cathedral) reminding us of the days when all of one trade congregated together has a peculiar charm from its very narrowness and lack of straight lines, as well as from the projecting character of most of the houses, several of which are certainly of fourteenth-century building, though altered much in Tudor, Elizabethan, or Stuart times.
“Canterbury, a historical and topographical account of the city”, J. Charles Cox, 1905, pp 280-1

Canterbury Historical & Archaeological Society: Cheker (or Chequer) of Hope

Weavers House, Canterbury, England


Canterbury. The Weavers.
Publisher: Photochrom Co. Ltd.

Google Street View (approximate)

The Old Weavers House takes its name from the influx of Flemish and Huguenot weavers who settled in the area after fleeing from religious persecution during the 16th and 17th centuries. Elizabeth I granted the Flemish weavers the right to establish their businesses in Canterbury, and they are known to have used this and other similar buildings nearby.
Britain Express

THE WEAVERS OF CANTERBURY.
Ancient Home.
By C. W. Beck.
The old home of the Canterbury Weavers at Canterbury, Kent, is quaintly beautiful. It dates back possibly to the fifteenth century, although, of course, restorers have since done their best with it. Nevertheless, it is still lovely. Stand near it on a moon-light night, and drink in the picturesqueness of the dark masses of black shadow and reflection, the bright masses of cold light-there is no corner more charming in Nuremberg or Rothenberg. The sluggish waters of the Stour flow beneath and the air is tremulous with the chiming of bells from many a steeple.

The persecution of the Protestants by the Duke of Alva, under Phillip II. of Spain, in Flanders, which began during the reign of King Edward VI., gave new life to trade in England by the communication of paper, silk, woollen, and other manufactures. The “Walloons” left Flanders and fled to England from the cruelties inflicted on them on account of their religion. On the accession of Queen Elizabeth and the establishment of the Protestant religion they came over in bodies and were welcomed by the Queen, who granted them her protection.

Those who were weavers in fine silk chose Canterbury for their habitation, where they might have the benefit of the river Stour. and easy communication with the metropolis. Those who were permitted to settle in Canter-bury consisted only of eighteen housekeepers. They sent a petition to the Mayor and alder-men of Canterbury for the grant of certain privileges for their convenience and protection. The Queen, in 1561, granted them the Undercroft of the Cathedral Church, as a place of worship. They increased as persecution abroad grew, and in 1676 Charles II. granted them a charter. This enabled them to be-come a company by the name of the Master, Wardens, Assistants, and Fellowships of Weavers, John Six becoming their first Master.
Nearing 1800 the silk weaving manufacture of Canterbury greatly decayed, the most part being removed to Spitalfields in London. An ingenious and public spirited manufacturer of Canterbury, John Callaway, in 1787 invented a beautiful new article of fabric called “Canterbury muslins.” He combined the old weaving with the inventions of Sir Richard Ark-wright.

To-day the old weaving Industry is represented by the many gabled building overhanging one branch of the Stour, where visitors may see something of the old home weaving still carried on, and may rejoice in a delightful old house, one of the most picturesque of its kind remaining. The window boxes give a pleasant bit of colour to the view of those who pause on the Westgate bridge and look down the stream.
Sydney Morning Herald, 11 June 1938

The Weavers of Canterbury whose old house was described and illustrated in the ‘Herald” by C W Beck have recently abandoned the old place for a modern shop, not far from the Westgate Bridge. The present weavers numbering about forty, are descendants of the original weavers. They are very consolvatlve, and do not mix with the other citizens of Canterbury.
Sydney Morning Herald, 18 June 1938

Harbour, Ramsgate, England


The Harbour, Ramsgate
On wall:
Pleasure yachts leaving Ramsgate harbour
Postmarked: 1908
Publisher: Regal Art Publishing Co, London

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The construction of Ramsgate Harbour began in 1749 and was completed in about 1850. The two most influential architects of the harbour were father and son John Shaw and John Shaw Jr, who designed the clockhouse, the obelisk, the lighthouse and the Jacob’s Ladder steps. The harbour has the unique distinction of being the only harbour in the United Kingdom awarded the right to call itself a Royal Harbour. This was bestowed by King George IV after he was taken by the hospitality shown by the people of Ramsgate when he used the harbour to depart and return with the Royal Yacht Squadron in 1821. Because of its proximity to mainland Europe, Ramsgate was a chief embarkation point both during the Napoleonic Wars and for the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940. The ferry terminal area is built upon reclaimed land.
Wikipedia

Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury


Canterbury Cathedral, S.W.
Publisher: Photochrom Co., London & Tunbridge Wells

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UNESCO World Heritage Listing
The Precincts of Canterbury Cathedral, City Trail Number 3 (pdf)
Gotik-Romanik (More pictures)

Founded in 597, the cathedral was completely rebuilt between 1070 and 1077. The east end was greatly enlarged at the beginning of the 12th century and largely rebuilt in the Gothic style following a fire in 1174, with significant eastward extensions to accommodate the flow of pilgrims visiting the shrine of Thomas Becket, the archbishop who was murdered in the cathedral in 1170. The Norman nave and transepts survived until the late 14th century when they were demolished to make way for the present structures.
Wikipedia.

St Augustine, the first Archbishop of Canterbury, arrived on the coast of Kent as a missionary to England in 597AD. He came from Rome, sent by Pope Gregory the Great. It is said that Gregory had been struck by the beauty of Angle slaves he saw for sale in the city market and despatched Augustine and some monks to convert them to Christianity. Augustine was given a church at Canterbury (St Martin’s, after St Martin of Tours, still standing today) by the local King, Ethelbert whose Queen, Bertha, a French Princess, was already a Christian.This building had been a place of worship during the Roman occupation of Britain and is the oldest church in England still in use. Augustine had been consecrated a bishop in France and was later made an archbishop by the Pope. He established his seat within the Roman city walls (the word cathedral is derived from the the Latin word for a chair ‘cathedra’, which is itself taken from the Greek ‘kathedra’ meaning seat.) and built the first cathedral there, becoming the first Archbishop of Canterbury.

Since that time, there has been a community around the Cathedral offering daily prayer to God; this community is arguably the oldest organisation in the English speaking world. The present Archbishop, The Most Revd Justin Welby, is 105th in the line of succession from Augustine. Until the 10th century, the Cathedral community lived as the household of the Archbishop. During the 10th century, it became a formal community of Benedictine monks, which continued until the monastery was dissolved by King Henry VIII in 1540. Augustine’s original building lies beneath the floor of the Nave – it was extensively rebuilt and enlarged by the Saxons, and the Cathedral was rebuilt completely by the Normans in 1070 following a major fire. There have been many additions to the building over the last nine hundred years, but parts of the Quire and some of the windows and their stained glass date from the 12th century. By 1077, Archbishop Lanfranc had rebuilt it as a Norman church, described as “nearly perfect”. A staircase and parts of the North Wall – in the area of the North West transept also called the Martyrdom – remain from that building.
Canterbury Cathedral

In 1093, a man named Anselm became Archbishop of Canterbury. Anselm was a quiet scholarly type, known for his wisdom and piety. But it is to him, along with the priors Ernulf and Conrad, that we owe much of the Romanesque architecture and art that survives today. Most notably, Anselm built the huge and beautifully decorated crypt beneath the east end, which still survives fully intact. An extensive choir with ambulatory, consecrated in 1130, was then built over the crypt.

Critical to the history of Canterbury Cathedral was the murder of St. Thomas Becket on Tuesday, December 29, 1170, by order of King Henry II. The king later performed penance there in 1174. On September 5 of that same year, the great Romanesque choir was devastated by a fire. The income from pilgrims visiting the Shrine of St. Thomas, which was reported almost immediately to be a place of miraculous healing, largely paid for the subsequent rebuilding of the cathedral.
Sacred Destinations.


Canterbury Cathedral, Gate of Dark Entry
Publisher: Photochrom Co., London & Tunbridge Wells

The ‘Dark Entry’ is a passage which joins the Green Court and the cathedral buildings. It runs beneath the building known as the Prior’s Lodging (Image 1-3). According to a cathedral legend, made popular by Richard Barham in his Ingoldsby Legends, the passage is haunted by the ghost of Nell Cook. Nell worked as a servant girl for an elderly canon and became annoyed when he engaged in an affair. When the canon and his lover both died from poinsoned food, the finger of suspicion pointed at Nell. Her punishment was to be buried under the flagstones which pave the Dark Entry.
Canterbury History and Archaeological Society

Read moreCanterbury Cathedral, Canterbury

Dover Castle, Kent


Dover Castle, Keep and & Constable’s Tower from W

Not dated. C.1950

Message on back:
Norman Castle built between 1153-1189 of Caen stone brought from Normandy during the reign of King Henry II who was responsible for the murder of Thomas A’Beckett 1170.

All bedchambers, chapel & ante rooms are in the walls which are from 16′ to 21′ in width.

Even had water laid in every room, sanitation, and heating throughout when built. Wonderful fortress, never without a garrison of soldiers, who have even(?) living quarters attached.

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