Monumental Cemetery of Staglieno, Genoa


Genova – Cimitero di Staglieno
Monumental Cemetery of Staglieno, Genoa

Google Maps.

From Atlas Obscura:
In 1804, Napoleon, then in charge of northern Italy, passed the Edict of Saint-Cloud. On the heels of the 1835 cholera epidemic, as churches began to move stacked bodies out of overburdened catacombs and new burials took up the remaining urban space, plans were finally made for a monumental cemetery on the outskirts of town.

Designed by the famous Genovese architect Carlo Barabino in a Neo-Classical style, the Staglieno Cemetery (Cimitero Monumentale di Staglieno) opened in 1851. A compromise between the formality of the traditional orderly camposanto layout and the newly fashionable wilderness style of boschetto irregulare, seen in Père Lachaise in Paris, the grounds included cloisters, garden paths, and a reproduction of the famous Pantheon in Rome. The new cemetery quickly became the fashionable death option, and increasingly was a showcase for world-class sculpture.

Website.

Photos of statuary on Flickr

Loggia dei Cavalieri, Treviso


Treviso — Loggia dei Cavalieri

1938 (printed on back, possibly year).

“The Loggia dei Cavalieri is one of Treviso’s landmark sights. Standing proudly in Via Martiri della Libertà the beautiful pavilion-like structure was built in the late 1200s as a covered outdoor gathering place for the city’s noblemen. They would spend the evenings playing cards, discussing politics, or enjoying parties within the open-air protection of the arches. ”
(From https://www.summerinitaly.com/guide/loggia-dei-cavalieri)

Wikipedia in Italian, with photos.