Blanchot Mosque, Dakar, Senegal


33.–Afrique Occidentale (Sénégal)
DAKAR. La Mosqueée

Published: Edmond Fortier, c.1920
Image is early 1910s (predating extention to building, see below) but card might be later. Possibly postmarked 1925.

Streetview

When it was built, in the 1880s, the Blanchot Mosque was in the heart of the African quarter. Europeans lived around the Place du Commerce/Kermel–what is now Place de l’Indépendance/Protet … Between the mid-to late 1880s and the 1930s–when it was encase in a new building–the mosque underwent major transformations. Of concern here is the first one that occurred somewhere between 1914 and 1917 and consisted of an extension on the main façade as well as two porches on the lateral facades. … Another incongruous element on both Saint-Louis and Blanchot is the presence of a clock on the left hand “minaret” tower. There must have been one on each tower because the one that subsists today is on the right hand minaret. One is hard pressed to asset that the towers in question bare any resemblance or remotely mimic the function of the minaret which is to amplify the call to prayer by means of the human voice as opposed to the Christian practice of employing bells to announce prayer times and also to mark the time. Thus the mere presence of clocks on these supposed minarets undermines their true purpose while ensuring that the coloniser’s preoccupation with time and punctuality.
“Making and Remaking Mosques in Senegal”, by Cleo Cantone, pp. 137-8

Also, A Mosque in a Mosque: Some Observations on the Rue Blanchot Mosque in Dakar & its Relation to Other Mosques in the Colonial Period, which has a view of the mosque after the 1910s extension (go down to paragraph 22).

The Rue Blanchot Mosque was Dakar’s only Friday Mosque in colonial times. It was built in the 1880s and was enlarged several times, in the 1910s, the 1930s and again in the 50s
Eric Ross, academic, which includes map saying location and site of original building within extensions.

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