Leas Shelter, Folkestone, England


View from the Leas Shelter, Folkestone
Postmarked: 1916
Publisher: Photochrom Co. Ltd.

Google Street View (approximate).

In 1784, a landslip created a new strip of land between the beach and the cliffside, the length of the coast from Folkestone Harbour to Sandgate. A ribbon of land a few meters wide. In 1828, the Earl of Radnor built a toll road providing an easy route between Folkestone harbour and Sandgate. The original toll road costs were – motor car 10p, motorcycle with sidecar 2 and 1/2 p, motorcycle 2p, bicycle, horse and handcart 1/2 p. The original toll house (designed by the architect Sydney Smirke) remains within the park On either side of the toll road, land was cultivated and grazed. Old field boundaries are still used within the park, and the ‘Cow Path’ is the old drove route from The Leas.

In 1877, a series of paths was constructed. The Ordnance Survey map of 1898 (of the area) shows some of these paths, Including a path from the Leas Shelter on the Upper Leas leading down to the road. The Leas Lift opened in 1885, to improve access between the seafront and the upper Leas (of Folkestone). The park and seafront with their new pier, switchback ride (an early form of roller coaster – railway along the promenade), and beach amusements proved to be so popular, that a second lift was added in 1890. The remains of a further lift serving the ‘Metropole Hotel’ (now a block of apartments) can still be seen (on the Upper Leas), and yet another lift connected the western end of the Leas with Sandgate. In 1913, the area then known as Leas Cliff was leased by the Radnor Estate to the local corporation, to be used mainly for a park, but the estate still kept the tolls from the toll road. In the park, tea rooms, shelters and woodland walks were provided among the newly planted holm oaks (Quercus ilex) and pine trees so that people could “take the air”.
Wikipedia

Lifeboat Memorial, Aldeburgh, England


Lifeboat Memorial, Aldeburgh
c.1910

Google Maps.

The crew from Aldeburgh in Suffolk were responding to reports a ship had run aground in heavy seas on 7 December 1899. Their lifeboat was so battered during its launch it capsized, trapping six men who could not be rescued. A seventh man died of injuries later. . . . The 18-strong crew were attempting to launch one of the Royal National Lifeboat Association (RNLI)’s first self-righting lifeboats when it hit a ridge on the shingle beach. It capsized in shallow water, meaning it was unable to right itself, and the heavy seas pushed it up onto the beach, trapping the six. The rest were thrown into the water and survived, but one was so seriously injured he died three months later.
BBC News.

Lifeboat disaster memorial at Aldeburgh
Seven of the 18 crew lost their lives
The names of the seven are :
John BUTCHER, age 52; Charles CRISP, age 51; Herbert William DOWNING, age 23; Allan Arthur EASTER, age 28; Thomas MORRIS, age 36; James Miller WARD, age 21 and Walter George WARD, age 33.

Geograph (photo of crosses)

The Study, John Knox’s House, Edinburgh


The Study, John Knox’s House, Edinburgh
c.1902
Publisher: William J Hay, Edinburgh

Google Maps.

John Knox House, popularly known as “John Knox’s House”, is an historic house in Edinburgh, Scotland, reputed to have been owned and lived in by Protestant reformer John Knox during the 16th century. Although his name became associated with the house, he appears to have lived in Warriston Close where a plaque indicates the approximate site of his actual residence. The house itself was built from 1490 onwards, featuring a fine wooden gallery and hand-painted ceiling.
Wikipedia.

Deer, Welbeck Park, England


Deer in Welbeck Park
Publisher: Valentine

Google Maps

Welbeck has constantly evolved over the centuries – from a Premonstratensian Abbey founded in 1153, to a Cavalier residence in the 17th century; from English Gothic to the New Works of the nineteenth century with their mysterious labyrinth of tunnels. The MOD used many of the estate buildings as a Sixth Form College from 1954 to 2005. . . . Today Welbeck is still a working estate and contains a Grade 2 registered historic park designed in 1748 by Francis Richardson; ancient woodlands and forestry; a beautiful chain of lakes; farmland and grazing; a deer park; and some of the country’s most important rural heritage buildings.
Welbeck

Rue de Boigne, Chambery, France


CHAMBERY — La Rue des Portiques
c.1910

Google Street View.

The Rue de Boigne was constructed between 1824- 1830, thanks to the generosity of General Count Boigne. It connects three of the major sites in Chambery: the Elephants Fountain, the Place Saint Leger, and the Dukes of Savoy Castle. Its architecture, complete with high arched porticos or Arcades, was inspired by Turin Italy. Today it is lined with upscale stores and hotels.
GPSMyCity

Château de Chazeron, Loubeyrat, France


ENV. de CHATEL-GUYON — Le Château de Chazeron

Google Maps.

Website (in French).

The Château de Chazeron is a castle situated in the commune of Loubeyrat in the French département of Puy-de-Dôme, 3 km (1.9 mi) north-west of Châtel-Guyon. Originally a medieval castle, Chazeron was altered in the 17th century by the architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart. He built a staircase on the site of the keep and added an arcaded gallery. The moat was filled in, three of the external walls were demolished and two wings were added.
Wikipedia.


Côte d’Emeraude 1075. ROTHENEUF – Rochers sculptés
Le Tombeau de Saint-Budoc

Postmarked 1909

Google Street View.

This is the work of a priest from the 19th century, l’Abbé Fouré, who was also a painter and wood sculptor. At age 55, Abbe Foure suffered a stroke, which left him without hearing and speech ; as a result, he decided to retreat as a hermit in the cliffs of Rotheneuf. He spent the last 15 years of his life (from approximately 1894 to 1910) shaping the granite to create more than 300 statues of strange and grotesque faces and characters. The priest took his inspiration from various sources : religious myths as well as pagan legends and tales, but also from the notable events of his time. He represented the story of the Rotheneuf, a local family of fishermen who lived in the 16th/17th centuries. They became pirates and established their domination in the region by smuggling over most of the Emerald Coast, gathering an immense fortune (as the legend has it) before being chased during the French Revolution. The ensemble also features the French explorer and navigator Jacques Cartier, as well as famous Breton saints, such as Saint Budoc.
The Culture Trip

Construction, Panama Canal


Showing lower lock and canal channel to Atlantic, Gatun, Panama Canal.
1910s
Publisher: Isaac L. Maduro, Jr. (1904-1920’s)

Google Street View.

The Gatun Locks, a three-stage flight of locks 1¼ mi (1.9 km) long, lifts ships to the Gatun Lake level, some 87 ft (27 m) above sea level.
Wikipedia.


General View of Miraflores locks, Pedro Miguel locks in the Distance, Panama Canal.
1910s
Publisher: Isaac L. Maduro, Jr. (1904-1920’s)

Google Street View.

Miraflores is the name of one of the three locks that form part of the Panama Canal, and the name of the small lake that separates these locks from the Pedro Miguel Locks upstream. In the Miraflores locks, vessels are lifted (or lowered) 54 feet (16.5 m) in two stages, allowing them to transit to or from the Pacific Ocean port of Balboa in Panama City. Ships cross below the Bridge of the Americas, which connects North and South America.
Wikipedia.